Death

  • Someone has said that death is not a period, but a comma in the story of life. - From page 93 of “Billy Graham in Quotes” by Franklin Graham.
  • When we die, we face judgment, what is called the judgment of faith. The outcome of this judgment determines whether we go to the intermediate Heaven or the intermediate Hell. This initial judgment depends not on our works but on our faith. It is not about what we’ve done during our lives but about what Christ has done for us. If we have accepted Christ’s atoning death for us, then when God judges us after we die, he sees his Son’s sacrifice for us, not our sin. Salvation is a free gift, to which we can contribute absolutely nothing (Ephesians 2:8-9; Titus 3:5).  - From location 1023 of the Kindle Book "Heaven" by Randy Alcorn
  • All mankind is sitting on Death Row.  How we die or when is not the main issue, but where [we] go after death. - From page 93 of “Billy Graham in Quotes” by Franklin Graham.
  • Meanwhile, we on this dying Earth can relax and rejoice for our loved ones who are in the presence of Christ. As the apostle Paul tells us, though we naturally grieve at losing loved ones, we are not “to grieve like the rest of men, who have no hope” (1 Thessalonians 4:13). Our parting is not the end of our relationship, only an interruption. We have not “lost” them, because we know where they are. They are experiencing the joy of Christ’s presence in a place so wonderful that Christ called it Paradise. And one day, we’re told, in a magnificent reunion, they and we “will be with the Lord forever. Therefore encourage each other with these words” (1 Thessalonians 4:17-18). - From location 1498 of the Kindle Book "Heaven" by Randy Alcorn 
  • Physical vs. Spiritual Death - If we were to give our life for someone else, the death we would endure would be only physical. We cannot die spiritually in the place of another person. But that is precisely what Jesus Christ did. Death is separation. Physical death is the separation of the soul and spirit from the body. Spiritual death is the separation of the soul and spirit from God. This is what makes hell such a terrible place; those in hell are separated from God. And because God is the source of all good—all joy, peace, love, and other blessings—hell is the opposite. It is misery, unrest, hate, and so on. This is the separation that Jesus endured for us. He died physically also; that is true. His death was particularly painful and degrading. But the truly horrible aspect of his death was his separation from the Father when he was made sin for us and bore sin’s punishment. - From the commentary on John 15:12-14 from the Boice Expositional Commentary Series (27 volume) bu James Montgomery Boice.
  • Death for [a Christian] is the doorway to heaven’s glory.  Because of Christ’s resurrection we can joyously say with Paul, “Where, O death, is your victory?” [1 Corinthians 15:55 NIV]. - From page 94 of “Billy Graham in Quotes” by Franklin Graham.
  • Death is an abnormal condition because it tears apart what God created and joined together. God intended for our bodies to last as long as our souls. - From location 2112 of the Kindle Book "Heaven" by Randy Alcorn  
  • Death is not the end of the road - it is merely a gateway to eternal life beyond the grave. - From page 94 of “Billy Graham in Quotes” by Franklin Graham.
  • This, then, is the most basic truth about our resurrected bodies: They are the same bodies God created for us, but they will be raised to greater perfection than we’ve ever known. We don’t know everything about them, of course, but we do know a great deal. Scripture does not leave us in the dark about our resurrection bodies. - From location 2181 of the Kindle Book "Heaven" by Randy Alcorn  
  • Jesus walked the earth in his resurrection body for forty days, showing us how we would live as resurrected human beings. In effect, he also demonstrated where we would live as resurrected human beings—on Earth. Christ’s resurrection body was suited for life on Earth, not primarily life in the intermediate Heaven. As Jesus was raised to come back to live on Earth, so we will be raised to come back to live on Earth (1 Thessalonians 4:14; Revelation 21:1-3). - From location 2205 of the Kindle Book "Heaven" by Randy Alcorn  
  • For the Christian, death can be faced realistically and with victory, because he knows “that neither death nor life … shal be able to separate us from the love of God” [Romans 8:38-39 NKJV]. - From page 94 of “Billy Graham in Quotes” by Franklin Graham.
  • A radio preacher, speaking about a Christian woman whose Christian husband had died, said, “Little did she know that when she hugged her husband that morning, she would never hug him again.” Though the preacher’s words were well intentioned, they were not true. He could have said, “She’d never again hug her husband in this life,” or better, “She would not be able to hug her husband again until the next world.” Because of the coming resurrection of the dead, we will be able to hug each other again—on the New Earth. - From location 2495 of the Kindle Book "Heaven" by Randy Alcorn  
  • Sooner or later, we are going to face death; should we be making preparations while we are living?  - From page 95 of “Billy Graham in Quotes” by Franklin Graham.
  • This, then, is the most basic truth about our resurrected bodies: They are the same bodies God created for us, but they will be raised to greater perfection than we’ve ever known. We don’t know everything about them, of course, but we do know a great deal. Scripture does not leave us in the dark about our resurrection bodies.  - From location 2181 of the Kindle Book "Heaven" by Randy Alcorn  
  • One of the primary goals in this life should be to prepare for death.  Everything else should be secondary.  - From page 95 of “Billy Graham in Quotes” by Franklin Graham.
  • Once we understand that Christ’s resurrection is the prototype for the resurrection of mankind and the earth, we realize that Scripture has given us an interpretive precedent for approaching passages concerning human resurrection and life on the New Earth. Shouldn’t we interpret passages alluding to resurrected people living on the New Earth as literally as those concerning Christ’s resurrected life during the forty days he walked on the old Earth?  - From location 2237 of the Kindle Book "Heaven" by Randy Alcorn  
  • When Paul speaks of our resurrection bodies, he says, “The body that is sown is perishable, it is raised imperishable; it is sown in dishonor, it is raised in glory; it is sown in weakness, it is raised in power; it is sown a natural body, it is raised a spiritual body. If there is a natural body, there is also a spiritual body” (1 Corinthians 15:42-44).  - From location 2242 of the Kindle Book "Heaven" by Randy Alcorn  
  • If you knew the moment and manner of your death in advance, would you order your life differently?  - From page 96 of “Billy Graham in Quotes” by Franklin Graham.
  • The background of this concept lies in the truth that all who have ever lived are sinners, having broken God’s law, and that the penalty for sin is death. The Bible declares, “There is no one righteous, not even one; there is no one who understands, no one who seeks God. All have turned away, they have together become worthless; there is no one who does good, not even one” (Rom. 3:10–12). Moreover the Bible declares that the penalty for sin is death. It says, “The soul that sins will die” (Ezek. 18:4). This death is not merely physical death, though it is that. It is spiritual death as well. Death is separation. Physical death is the separation of the soul and spirit from the body. Spiritual death is the separation of the soul and the spirit from God. This is what we deserve as a consequence of our sin. But Jesus took that death to himself by his sacrifice. He became our substitute by experiencing both physical and spiritual death in our place. - From the commentary on John 19:30 from the Boice Expositional Commentary Series (27 volumes) by James Montgomery Boice.
  • The word departure literally means to pull up anchor and set sail.  Everything that happens prior to death is a preparation for the final voyage.  Death marks the beginning, not the end.  It is our journey to God.  - From page 96 of “Billy Graham in Quotes” by Franklin Graham.
  • We have the assurance of Scripture that all believers will survive the fire of testing and be raised. But it is not only ourselves that will outlast this world and be carried over to the new one. It is what we do with our lives. Our righteous works will follow us to Heaven (Revelation 14:13). Not only will some things that God has made survive his judgment, but so will some things we have done. Products of faithful lives will endure. They will be purified and “laid bare,” so their beauty will be forever seen. God’s fire will not destroy the whole Earth; it will destroy all that displeases him. But there is much that pleases him, and these things will endure the fire, to be reconstituted after the final resurrection of the dead. Not only acts of obedience and spiritual sacrifices, but also everything good will last forever and be carried over from one world to the next.  - From location 2454 of the Kindle Book "Heaven" by Randy Alcorn  
  • When we all reach the end of our earthly journey, we have all just begun.  - From page 96 of “Billy Graham in Quotes” by Franklin Graham.
  • The fact that Jesus picked up his relationships where they’d left off is a foretaste of our own lives after we are resurrected. We will experience continuity between our current lives and our resurrected lives, with the same memories and relational histories.  - From location 2236 of the Kindle Book "Heaven" by Randy Alcorn  
  • Though the Christian has no immunity from death and no claim to perpetual life on this planet, death is to him a friend rather than a foe, the beginning rather than the end, another step on the pathway to heaven rather than a leap into the unknown. - From page 96 of “Billy Graham in Quotes” by Franklin Graham.
  • Many people say they do not fear death, but the process of dying.  It’s not the destination, but the trip they dread.  - From page 97 of “Billy Graham in Quotes” by Franklin Graham.
  • Death is not the end of life; it is only the gateway to eternity.  - From page 97 of “Billy Graham in Quotes” by Franklin Graham.
  • Someday this life will end, but for the Christian death also marks a beginning - the beginning of a new life with God that will last forever.  - From page 97 of “Billy Graham in Quotes” by Franklin Graham.
  • I’m not affraid to die, for I know the joys of heaven are waiting.  My greatest desire is to live today in anticipation of tomorrow and be ready to be welcomed into His home for all eternity.  Will you be making the journey with me? - From page 97 of “Billy Graham in Quotes” by Franklin Graham.
  • Someday a loving Hand will be laid upon your shoulder and this brief message will be given: “Come home.”  - From page 97 of “Billy Graham in Quotes” by Franklin Graham.
  • In the NT, as in the OT, humans are mortals whose lives end in biological death (1 Cor. 15:21- 22). Human death is a universal experience (Heb. 9:27), and the only exception mentioned in the NT is Enoch (Gen. 5:24; Heb. 11:5). Three times in the NT humans are raised from the dead (Luke 7:11- 17; John 11:1- 44; Acts 9:36- 43), but they do not become immortal. Presumably they eventually die.  
    According to Paul, death is a result of human sin (Rom. 5:12; 6:23; 1 Cor. 15:21). However, through Christ’s death the consequences of Adam’s sin, i. e., human death, are cancelled (Rom. 5:10) and life for all is accomplished (v. 18). Christ’s death destroyed the one holding the power of death (Heb. 2:14) as well as death itself (2 Tim. 1:10). Christ thus became the Lord of the living and the dead (Rom. 14:9) and has the keys of death and Hades (Rev. 1:18). This does not mean that people no longer die. However, death is viewed in a new light. Christ’s resurrection from the dead is understood as the model that all believers may hope to experience (Col. 1:18; Rev. 1:5). Nothing can separate the faithful from the love of God in Christ (Rom. 8:38- 39). Physical death is spoken of in positive terms, as gain (Phil. 1:21) and as departing to be with Christ (v. 23).
    - From the definition of “Death” from "Eerdman’s Dictionary of the Bible" by David Noel Freedman
  • While death for the righteous can be precious (Ps. 116:15) and even be considered a form of sleep 13:3), for the wicked it can be considered punishment (cf. Deut. 21:22, 26; Ezek. 28:10). - From the Mounce Expository Dictionary of the Old and New Testament Words by William D. Mounce
  • Psalms 103:2 I said, O my God, take me not away in the midst of my days: thy years are throughout all generations.
    Everyone said it was such a tragedy. Doug was a funny, bright young man, and he had so much to look forward to. He wasn't even through college yet. The accident had been senseless, and so had his death. Why would God allow such a thing to happen?  
    We ask ourselves that question a lot. Why does God allow some things to happen? We always look at the question from our own, earthly, human perspective. We forget that death is a part of life and that it is a necessary passage in existence. To God, death is not a bad thing, but merely a part of the way things are. Death isn't a cruelty or a punishment. Our days on earth are a gift, and we should live them as fully as we can. If we die, we are in the Lord's hands, and everything will work out just fine. Faith is the key. We must learn to know that God has everything under control, and that He will turn all situations to good. Even death is a wonderful thing in the hands of God.
    Prayer: Lord, I do not understand the way things work sometimes, and I do not like to experience pain and suffering. Help me to see Your hand in all things. Grant me understanding. Amen. - From the August 10, 2018 devotional from Wisdom from the Psalms from Dan R. Dick
  • Despite death's great power and hostility, it is ultimately subject to God's sovereignty. Ironically, death finds its origin in God, who decreed that death would be the ultimate penalty for disobedience to his revealed command (Gen 2:17; 3:19; see also Ps 90:3- 11). When the first couple ate the forbidden fruit and rebelled against God, death accompanied sin into the world and has reigned over humankind ever since (Rom 5:12- 21; 6:23; Jas 1:15). Nevertheless, death remains under God's authority. God can use it as an ally against the objects of his wrath (Ex 15:12 [where the "earth" is best understood as the underworld]; Hos 13:14 [best translated as an invitation to death to serve as God's instrument of judgment against his sinful people]) or God can deliver the objects of his favor from its powerful grasp before they descend into its depths (Ps 18:4- 19; 116:3- 8).  - From the definition of Death in the "Dictionary of Biblical Imagery" by Longman III; Ryken, Leland and Wilhoit, James C.
  • In the end God will eliminate death from his world, swallowing up the great swallower once and for all (Is 25:6- 8). This conquest of death is not strictly a future event however. It began with Jesus, who conquered sin when he satisfied God's righteous requirements and died a sacrificial death for sinners (Rom 5:12- 21). He then conquered death when he rose from the grave on the third day (Rom 6:9- 10), destroying in the process the power of Satan, who uses the fear of death as a weapon against humankind (Heb 2:14- 15). Jesus 'resurrection guarantees the future resurrection of his people (1 Cor 15:12- 28) and the fulfillment of Isaiah's vision (1 Cor 15:50- 54). Death, the final enemy whose "reign" of futility and decay extends over the cosmos (Rom 8:20- 21), will be destroyed. Never again will God's people experience death's sorrow and pain, for it will have no place in the new world order (Rev 21:4). With the hope of the resurrection to sustain him, the apostle Paul viewed death as a defeated foe (1 Cor 15:55- 57; 2 Tim 1:10) that cannot separate God's people from his love (Rom 8:38- 39) or his presence (Phil 1:21- 23). Through saving faith in Jesus they have already passed from death to life (Jn 5:24- 27). - From the definition of Death in the "Dictionary of Biblical Imagery" by Longman III; Ryken, Leland and Wilhoit, James C.
  • Jesus 'victory over death only benefits God's people (Rev 20:6). Those who have not been the objects of his saving work will someday rise from the grave, but only so they may stand before his holy throne of judgment for final sentencing. They will then be thrown into the lake of fire, which the apostle John calls the "second death" (Rev 20:14; 21:8).- From the definition of Death in the "Dictionary of Biblical Imagery" by Longman III; Ryken, Leland and Wilhoit, James C.
  • Despite death's great power and hostility, it is ultimately subject to God's sovereignty. Ironically, death finds its origin in God, who decreed that death would be the ultimate penalty for disobedience to his revealed command (Gen 2:17; 3:19; see also Ps 90:3- 11). When the first couple ate the forbidden fruit and rebelled against God, death accompanied sin into the world and has reigned over humankind ever since (Rom 5:12- 21; 6:23; Jas 1:15). Nevertheless, death remains under God's authority. God can use it as an ally against the objects of his wrath (Ex 15:12 [where the "earth" is best understood as the underworld]; Hos 13:14 [best translated as an invitation to death to serve as God's instrument of judgment against his sinful people]) or God can deliver the objects of his favor from its powerful grasp before they descend into its depths (Ps 18:4- 19; 116:3- 8).  - From the definition of Death in the "Dictionary of Biblical Imagery" by Longman III; Ryken, Leland and Wilhoit, James C.
  • In the end God will eliminate death from his world, swallowing up the great swallower once and for all (Is 25:6- 8). This conquest of death is not strictly a future event however. It began with Jesus, who conquered sin when he satisfied God's righteous requirements and died a sacrificial death for sinners (Rom 5:12- 21). He then conquered death when he rose from the grave on the third day (Rom 6:9- 10), destroying in the process the power of Satan, who uses the fear of death as a weapon against humankind (Heb 2:14- 15). Jesus 'resurrection guarantees the future resurrection of his people (1 Cor 15:12- 28) and the fulfillment of Isaiah's vision (1 Cor 15:50- 54). Death, the final enemy whose "reign" of futility and decay extends over the cosmos (Rom 8:20- 21), will be destroyed. Never again will God's people experience death's sorrow and pain, for it will have no place in the new world order (Rev 21:4). With the hope of the resurrection to sustain him, the apostle Paul viewed death as a defeated foe (1 Cor 15:55- 57; 2 Tim 1:10) that cannot separate God's people from his love (Rom 8:38- 39) or his presence (Phil 1:21- 23). Through saving faith in Jesus they have already passed from death to life (Jn 5:24- 27). - From the definition of Death in the "Dictionary of Biblical Imagery" by Longman III; Ryken, Leland and Wilhoit, James C.
  • Jesus 'victory over death only benefits God's people (Rev 20:6). Those who have not been the objects of his saving work will someday rise from the grave, but only so they may stand before his holy throne of judgment for final sentencing. They will then be thrown into the lake of fire, which the apostle John calls the "second death" (Rev 20:14; 21:8).- From the definition of Death in the "Dictionary of Biblical Imagery" by Longman III; Ryken, Leland and Wilhoit, James C.