Pride versus Humility

  1. The third step we are to take is to humble ourselves in the sight of the Lord (v. 10). The steps are clear. If we are to be humble, we must begin by emptying ourselves of self and sin by resisting the devil. Next, that emptiness must be filled by the Holy Spirit as we draw near to God and we allow Him to draw near to us and to fill us to overflowing with Himself in the person of the Holy Spirit.
    Only then can we accomplish the admonishment of James to humble ourselves. We cannot do so in our own strength. It is impossible for us to humble ourselves by our own cleverness or ingenuity. We need the power of God Himself.  - From commentary on James 4:8 from The Preacher’s Commentary Series. Volumes 1-35: Genesis - Revelation by Stuart Briscoe. 
  2. James 4:6 - Therefore it says, “God opposes the proud, but gives grace to the humble.”   "God opposes the proud." That is, he stands in battle- array or in direct defiance and opposition against them. The proud man has his tactics, and God has his anti-tactics. The Word shows that there is a mutual opposition between God and the proud. And I note this particularly because in Proverbs it says, "He mocks proud mockers." They mock God, and God mocks them. God still counteracts the proud, as he did Pharaoh. - From the Crossway Commentary - James by Thomas Manton.
  3. James 4:6 - “God opposes the proud, but gives grace to the humble.  God's gift of sustaining grace is enjoyed only by those willing to admit their need and accept the gift. The proud, on the other hand, meet only resistance from God. God's opposition toward the arrogant person is a recurring motif in the OT (see, e. g., Ps. 18:27; 34:18; 51:17; 72:4; 138:6; Isa. 61:1; Zeph. 3:11- 12). Worth mentioning is that "pride" (hyperēphania) is often associated with jealousy and envy in Hellenistic writings.  - From commentary on James 4:6 from the Pillar New Testament Commentary (14 volumes) by Eerdmans Publisher.
  4. God opposes the proud. Of all sins God sets himself to punish the sin of pride. He abhors other sinners but professes open defiance and hostility against the proud. Someone asked a philosopher what God was doing; he answered that his whole work was to lift up the humble and cast down the proud. This is the very business of providence; the Bible is full of examples. This was the sin that turned angels into devils; they wanted to be above everyone, not under anyone, and therefore God tumbled them down to hell. As someone says, "God could not endure to have pride so near him." Then pride wrecked all mankind when it crept out of heaven into paradise on earth. - From the Crossway Commentary - James by Thomas Manton.
  5. Proverbs 11:2 (NIV) - When pride comes, then comes disgrace, but with humility comes wisdom. We know that pride was the main reason for the Fall (Genesis 3:5); and it still lives in fallen man (Mark 7:22). God shames men because they do not know their limits and because they refuse to stand on the low ground on which he has placed them (Luke 18:14; Isaiah 2:17). - From the Crossway Commentary "Proverbs" by Charles Bridges.
  6. Proverbs 3:32 - Toward the scorners he is scornful, but to the humble he gives favor. 
  7. Proverbs 11:2 - When pride comes, then comes disgrace, but with humility comes wisdom. (NIV)
  8. Proverbs 13:7 - One man pretends to be rich, yet has nothing: another pretends to be poor, yet has great wealth. (NIV)
  9. Proverb 15:25 - The Lord tears down the proud mans house but he keeps the widows boundaries intact. (NIV)
  10. Proverbs 16:2 - All a man’s ways seem innocent to him, but motives are weighed by the Lord. (NIV)
  11. Proverbs 16:5 - The Lord detests all the proud of heart.  Be sure of this: They will not go unpunished. (NIV)
  12. Proverbs 16:18-19 - Pride goes before destruction, a haughty spirit before a fall.  Better to be lowly in spirit and among the oppressed than to share plunder with the proud. (NIV)
  13. Proverbs 18:12 - Before his downfall, a mans heart is proud, but humilty comes before honor. (NIV)
  14. Proverbs 21:4 - Haughty eyes and a proud heart, the lamp of the wicked, are sin. (ESV)
  15. Proverbs 22:4 - The reward for humility and fear of the Lord is riches and honor and life. (ESV) Humility is not mere meekness or modesty. While the latter is a lovely quality, it is not specifically a Christian grace. Humility is also not the servility of the hypocrite who is secretly seeking his own ends. It is easy to see genuine humility, as it will always be accompanied by the fear of the LORD. This fear is the blessed, holy reverence that only God's children experience. It represses presumption and establishes humility. An accurate understanding of who God is will always lay us in the lowest dust before him. Then humility is our greatest glory. The most humble is the most triumphant Christian. He may be depressed, but he is highly exalted. He has the wealth of grace and of glory. Nobody can deprive him of these. - From the Crossway Commentary "Proverbs" by Charles Bridges.
  16. Humble  people are grateful people. They know who really deserves the credit and the glory for what they do. The only problem is that gratitude does not come natural to human beings. We like to take credit for everything that comes into our lives. Therefore, a grateful heart is something that has to be cultivated. One has to be intentional about it. This is why I begin each day giving thanks to God. I thank him for the gift of life, for my wife, my children, and for all of the other relationships that He has blessed me with. I thank Him for all the resources He has entrusted me with and the work that He has called me to do. Finally, I thank Him for all the spiritual blessings of life, particularly for His son, Jesus.
    As a result of this, I now find myself giving thanks to Him throughout the day. It has become a natural part of my life. It has truly changed the way I see life, as I now recognize that all I am and all that I have is a gift of God. And I am so grateful!
    - From the November 23, 2015 blog post “Who Should Get The Credit?  Thoughts about Thanksgiving” from Richard E. Simmons, III
  17. The reference to the gift of grace looks back to God's demand for loyalty (vv. 4- 5). God in grace gives his people the help they need to resist the appeal of the world and to remain loyal to him. The reference to "the humble" constitutes the theme for vv. 7- 10, where James pleads for submission to God.  "The humble" are the people who willingly submit to God's desire for them rather than proudly insisting on satisfying their own desires for pleasure (cf. vv. 1- 3). - From commentary on James 4:6 of the Expositor’s Bible Commentary - Revised Series by Zondervan Publishing.
  18. Be not overly righteous, and do not make yourself too wise. Why should you destroy yourself? (Ephes. 7:16) We should never assume that living righteously places God under some obligation to us, or promotes us to some special, protected status. We should live righteously, but never be overrighteous. Overrighteousness was the sin of the Pharisees. They advocated and practiced a righteousness by works, publically demonstrating the pride in their hearts through their attire, attitude, and actions. The Bible soberly warns us about such a display of pride:

    “But he giveth more grace. Wherefore he saith, God resisteth the proud, but giveth grace unto the humble” (Js. 4:6).

    “Likewise, ye younger, submit yourselves unto the elder. Yea, all of you be subject one to another, and be clothed with humility: for God resisteth the proud, and giveth grace to the humble” (1 Pe. 5:5).

    “Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall” (Pr. 16:18).

    - From the reading about Ecclesiastes 7:15 in the
     Preacher’s Outline and Sermon Bible Old and New Testament Commentary Set (44-Volumes) - by Alpha-Omega Ministries, Publisher: Leadership Ministries Worldwide
  19. In one of the beatitudes of the Sermon on the Mount he indicated the manner in which we must enter, saying, “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven” (Matt. 5:3). This does not mean, “Blessed are the poor-spirited” or “Blessed are failures.” To be poor in spirit is the opposite of being rich in pride. It means to be humble. So Christ’s first requirement for entering his kingdom is to humble yourself and take up the position of a suppliant before him. It is to pray with the publican, “God be merciful to me, a sinner.” - From commentary on John 18:36-37 from the Boice Expositional Commentary Series (27 Volumes) by James Montgomery Boice
  20. "If anyone loves the world, the love of the Father is not in him. For all that is in the world, the lust of the flesh and the lust of the eyes and the boastful pride of life, is not from the Father, but is from the world" (1 John 2:15- 16). The lust and envy that James mentions in 4:2 are reflections of "the boastful pride of life" that characterizes the worldly passion for personal satisfaction. - From commentary on James 1-6 from the MacArthur’s New Testament Commentary: Bundle by John MacArthur.
  21.  Chronicles 2:14 - ...if my people who are called by my name humble themselves, and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven and will forgive their sin and heal their land.
  22. James first says that worldly unbelievers do not have because they do not ask. Many of them do not even think of asking God for help of any kind, because they consider themselves self- sufficient, fully able to take care of themselves. They believe that all their needs and wants can be met by human means through their own wisdom, power, and diligence. They do not believe that "every good thing given and every perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of lights, with whom there is no variation or shifting shadow" (James 1:17). Consequently, it never occurs to them to ask Him for anything.  - From commentary on James 1-6 from the MacArthur’s New Testament Commentary: Bundle by John MacArthur.
  23. Psalm 18:27 -  For you save a humble people, but the haughty eyes you bring down.
  24. 1 Peter 5:5 - Likewise, you who are younger, be subject to the elders. Clothe yourselves, all of you, with humility toward one another, for “God opposes the proud but gives grace to the humble. "God is opposed to the proud, but gives grace to the humble." In other words, if a person is consumed with worldly lusts, desires, ambitions, pride, and love, he has no claim on this greater grace.  Antitossomai (is opposed) was used as a military term depicting a full army ready for battle. God is in full battle array, as it were, against the proud, because pride is the basic sin from which all others issue. It is not always manifested in ways that other men can see, but it is never hidden from God's eyes. - From commentary on James 1-6 from the MacArthur’s New Testament Commentary: Bundle by John MacArthur.
  25. James 4:10 - Humble yourselves before the Lord, and he will exalt you.  It is impossible for us to humble ourselves by our own cleverness or ingenuity. We need the power of God Himself.
    A person who is truly humble is a person who has turned from sin and the devil and is walking with God. Authentic humility comes from God. A humble person is one who has seen himself as he really is in the sight of God, has repented of his sin, and is following Jesus as his Lord.
    The promise to such a person is also clear. As we humble ourselves in the sight of the Lord, “He will lift you up” (v. 10). It is never God’s desire to “put you down.” It is sin that leads us down to death and destruction. The Lord delights in lifting you up. Indeed, he who humbles himself will be exalted. 
     - From commentary on James 4:10 from The Preacher’s Commentary Series. Volumes 1-35: Genesis - Revelation by Stuart Briscoe. 
  26. Pride is often thought of only in positive terms, not as a negative trait, and certainly not as a sin. People must have a healthy self-image and strong self-esteem in order to be successful in life. If all a person does is focus upon his weaknesses and lack of skills, he will never be successful or achieve anything of significance. It is absolutely essential to recognize our strengths and skills in order to plow through life capably and productively. We should take pride in who we are and in the abilities God has given us, acknowledging that it has all come from God and has been given to us to make a worthwhile contribution to society. This is an acceptable pride, a humble pride.
    But pride becomes sinful when we exalt who we are and esteem our abilities over the abilities of others. When we use our appearance, authority, or skills to degrade, humiliate, shame, dominate, or enslave others—this kind of pride is evil. It is wicked arrogance and will cause us to face the terrifying judgment of God. - From the reading about the Introduction to the Book of Isaiah in the Preacher’s Outline and Sermon Bible Old and New Testament Commentary Set (44-Volumes) - by Alpha-Omega Ministries, Publisher: Leadership Ministries Worldwide
  27. The real terror of this pride is that it is a thing of the heart. It certainly means haughtiness, but the man who suffers from it might well appear to be walking in downcast humility, while all the time there was in his heart a vast contempt for all his fellow- men. This pride shuts itself off from God for three reasons. (i) It does not know its own need.... It walks in proud self-sufficiency. (ii) It cherishes its own independence. It will be beholden to no man; it will not even be beholden to God.... (iii) It does not recognize its own sin.... A pride like that cannot receive help, because it does not know that it needs help, and, therefore, it cannot ask. It loves, not God, but itself. (The Letters of James and Peter [Philadelphia:Westminster, 1960], 124; emphasis in original). - From commentary on James 1-6 from the MacArthur’s New Testament Commentary: Bundle by John MacArthur.
  28. The picture James gives here is of a proud, defiant sinner, setting himself up as his real god, not simply in self- centeredness but in self- worship. He is an enemy of the true God and has no part in His grace. Consequently, and finally, therefore, the worldly person's conflict with God involves a forfeiture of divine forgiveness. God has no use for the proud, because they put themselves beyond His grace. 
    God does, however, give grace to the humble. He has always done so. Through Isaiah, He assured His ancient people Israel that "to this one I will look, to him who is humble and contrite of spirit, and who trembles at My word" (Isa. 66:2). The first and foundational Beatitude is "Blessed are the poor in spirit," that is, the humble, "for theirs is the kingdom of heaven" (Matt. 5:3). Just as pride is the root of all sin, so humility is the root of all righteousness. It is only when the things of the world are no longer admired and sought, when self- concern is replaced with concern for God's glory, that God's Spirit can work His sovereign and gracious will in a heart, changing it from being an enemy to being a friend. - From commentary on James 1-6 from the MacArthur’s New Testament Commentary: Bundle by John MacArthur.
  29. Matt. 23:12 - Jesus said, "Whoever exalts himself shall be humbled; and whoever humbles himself shall be exalted” - 
  30. Luke 18:14 - For everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, but the one who humbles himself will be exalted.
  31. Luke 14:11 - For everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, but the one who humbles himself will be exalted.
  32. Scripture says:God opposes the proud, but gives grace to the humble.” This verse (Prov. 3:34) is a favorite text in the Christian ethical tradition, and it gives people a choice:They may humble themselves and receive God’s grace, or they may continue in their self- sufficiency and experience his wrath. Not their past sins, but their present state of heart, determines God’s attitude. James’ God is the gracious God of scripture. - From commentary on James 4:6 in Understanding the Bible Commentary Series (New Testament Set) by Ward W. Gasque, Robert L. Hubbard, Jr., and Robert K. Johnston. 
  33.  Psalm 147:6 -  The LORD lifts up the humble; he casts the wicked to the ground.
  34. Pride: ga’on (גָּאוֹן, 1347), “pride”. The majority of the uses of ga‘on are negative in that they connote human “pride” as an antonym for humility (Prov. 16:18). Proverbs puts ga‘on together with arrogance, evil behavior, and perverse speech.  The Septuagint translations are:hubris (“insolence; arrogance”) and huperephania (“arrogance; haughtiness; pride”). Some other nouns are related to |ga’on. Ge’ahoccurs once to mean “pride” (Prov. 8:13). - From the Vine’s Complete Expository  Dictionary.
  35. Humble: tapeinos (ταπεινός, 5011) primarily signifies “low- lying.” It is used always in a good sense in the NT, metaphorically, to denote (a) “of low degree, brought low,” Luke 1:52; Rom. 12:16, kjv, “ (men) of low estate,” rv, “ (things that are) lowly” (i. e., of low degree); 2 Cor. 7:6, kjv, “cast down,” rv, “lowly”; the preceding context shows that this occurrence belongs to (a); Jas. 1:9, “of low degree”; (b) humble in spirit, Matt. 11:29; 2 Cor. 10:1, rv, “lowly,” kjv “base”; Jas. 4:6; 1 Pet. 5:5. See base, cast, Note (7), degree (Note), lowly. 
    2. tapeinophron, “humbleminded” (phren, “the mind”), 1 Pet. 3:8; see courteous. 
    - From the Vine’s Complete Expository  Dictionary.
  36. We must guard against pride and arrogance and self-sufficiency. We must not live independent of God, ignoring and denying Him. Just as we need each other as friends and neighbors, so we need the Lord. God is not only our Creator, but He is also the only One who can help us through the crises of life. Furthermore, He is the only One who can empower us to walk righteously and victoriously throughout life, conquering all the temptations and trials that confront us. Because of our desperate need for the Lord, we must never walk independent of Him. We must guard against an evil spirit of pride, arrogance, and self-sufficiency.
    “And whosoever shall exalt himself shall be abased; and he that shall humble himself shall be exalted” (Mt. 23:12).
    “Wherefore let him that thinketh he standeth take heed lest he fall” (1 Co. 10:12).
    “But he giveth more grace. Wherefore he saith, God resisteth the proud, but giveth grace unto the humble” (Js. 4:6).
    “For all that is in the world, the lust of the flesh, and the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life, is not of the Father, but is of the world” (1 Jn. 2:16).
    “The wicked in his pride doth persecute the poor: let them be taken in the devices that they have imagined” (Ps. 10:2).
    “Thou hast rebuked the proud that are cursed, which do err from thy commandments” (Ps. 119:21).  
    - From the "Thought 1” reading from Isaiah 9:8-9 in the Preacher’s Outline and Sermon Bible Old and New Testament Commentary Set (44-Volumes) - by Alpha-Omega Ministries, Publisher: Leadership Ministries Worldwide
  37. Luke 1:51-52 - he has scattered the proud in the thoughts of their hearts;  he has brought down the mighty from their thrones and exalted those of humble estate.
  38. Romans 12:16 Live in harmony with one another. Do not be haughty, but associate with the lowly. Never be wise in your own sight.
  39. Matthew 11:29 - Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.
  40.  Proverbs 1:2  - When pride comes, then comes disgrace, but with the humble is wisdom.
  41. Isaiah 66:2 - All these things my hand has made, and so all these things came to be, declares the LORD. But this is the one to whom I will look: he who is humble and contrite in spirit and trembles at my word.http://example.com
  42. Pride keeps some very bad company. It is associated with such varied vices as perverted speech (Prov 8:13), boastfulness (Jer 48:30), defiance of God (Jer 50:29), indifference to the poor and needy (Ezek 16:49), self- deceit (Obad 3), the lust of the flesh and of the eyes (1 Jn 2:16) and false trust in riches (1 Tim 6:17). Twice pride is placed in a catalog of highly charged vices (Mk 7:21- 22; 2 Tim 3:2- 5). - From the definition of Pride in the Dictionary of Biblical Imagery from Tremper Longman, III and James C. Wilhoit.
  43. Pride in the Bible is not just an abstraction but instead yields a series of vivid images. It is especially linked to certain body parts:the heart, the mouth and the eyes. It is also treated as generic evil or wickedness. Material prosperity and its accompanying power are prerequisites to pride. Morally the most common manifestation of pride is oppression of less fortunate people. Spiritually its root sin is disregard for God or defiance of him. The leading self- delusion of proud people is their false security in themselves and their resources. The most important thing about proud people is that God opposes them, and the most predictable thing we know about pride is that God will bring it down (see especially Is 2:12- 17). Indeed, pride in the Bible seems always on the verge of being humbled. The biblical images of pride add up to such a repulsive picture that they would lead one to abhor it, yet the frequency with which it appears in the Bible suggests something of its perennial appeal to the sinful heart. - From the definition of Pride in the Dictionary of Biblical Imagery from Tremper Longman, III and James C. Wilhoit.
  44. “The Lord will destroy the house of the proud: but he will establish the border of the widow” (Pr. 15:25).
  45. “Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall” (Pr. 16:18).
  46. “A man’s pride shall bring him low: but honour shall uphold the humble in spirit” (Pr. 29:23).
  47. “The lofty looks of man shall be humbled, and the haughtiness of men shall be bowed down, and the Lord alone shall be exalted in that day. For the day of the Lord of hosts shall be upon every one that is proud and lofty, and upon every one that is lifted up; and he shall be brought low” (Is. 2:11-12).
  48. “And the loftiness of man shall be bowed down, and the haughtiness of men shall be made low: and the Lord alone shall be exalted in that day” (Is. 2:17).
  49. “For, behold, the day cometh, that shall burn as an oven; and all the proud, yea, and all that do wickedly, shall be stubble: and the day that cometh shall burn them up, saith the Lord of hosts, that it shall leave them neither root nor branch” (Mal. 4:1).
  50. Paul insisted that there is a positive kind of pride among Christians. He was proud (kaucháomai and related nouns) of the churches he had founded and wanted them to be proud of him as well (Rom. 15:17; 1 Cor. 15:31; 2 Cor. 1:14; 5:12; 7:4, 14; Phil. 2:16); but he was careful to explain that his success was entirely due to God’s gifts (e. g., cf. Rom. 15:15- 19; 2 Cor. 1:12; 5:11- 15). Thus his boasting “in Christ” was tantamount to thanking God (cf. 2 Th. 1:3f.). In a different context he warned against considering oneself so lofty (hypsēlá) that one fails to feel awe at the mystery of God’s working (Rom. 11:20; cf. vv. 17f., 25- 27, 33- 36). Pride is legitimate only when it remembers to attribute all honor to God (this may also be inferred from Ps. 47:4 [MT 5] and Isa. 4:2; cf. also 1 Cor. 11:15).
    ….Pride tries to ignore God (Ps. 10:4) and prefers to trust in what is deceptive and empty (40:4 [MT 5]). But here the focus is more often on pride in relationship to other people. Pride is associated with wickedness and injustice (Ps. 94:2- 7; Prov. 21:3f.; Job 40:11f.) and is anti- thetical to wisdom (Prov. 8:12f.), patience (Eccl. 7:8), and humility (Prov. 11:2; cf. Jas. 4:6; 1 Pet. 5:5). The proud tell contemptuous lies against the righteous (Ps. 31:18 [MT 19]; 59:12 [MT 13]). At ease in their riches (123:4), they represent the antithesis of the lowly poor (Job 22:29; Prov. 15:25; 16:19; 29:23; cf. Ezk. 16:49, which identifies the sin of Sodom as pride and a complacent prosperity that ignores the needy; cf. also Ps. 73:3- 9).
    ….As in the OT, so also in the NT, pride is associated with other vices. In Mk. 7:22 haughtiness (hyperēphanía) is listed with the sins of envy, slander, and foolishness; in 2 Tim. 3:2 bragging (alazṓn) is mentioned with love of self, love of money, arrogance, and abusiveness. 1 Jn. 2:16 links alazoneía toú bíou (which may refer to ostentatious pride in possessions or status, or to overconfidence inflated by possessions or status) with lust (cf. bíos [RSV “goods”] in 3:17; see R. E. Brown, Epistles of John [AB, 1982], pp. 311f.).
    Thus the proud person offends against God by self- exaltation, against other people by self- preoccupation, and against the self by self- deception. The delusion increases until one fancies oneself so high as to be invulnerable (Ob. 3). “Though you soar aloft like the eagle, though your nest is set among the stars, thence I will bring you down, says the Lord” (v. 4; cf. Isa. 2:10- 17). 
    - From the definition of Pride in the International Standard Bible Dictionary by Gieffrey W. Bromiley.
  51. “These six things doth the Lord hate: yea, seven are an abomination unto him: A proud look, a lying tongue, and hands that shed innocent blood, An heart that deviseth wicked imaginations, feet that be swift in running to mischief, A false witness that speaketh lies, and he that soweth discord among brethren” (Pr. 6:16-19).
  52. “When pride cometh, then cometh shame: but with the lowly is wisdom” (Pr. 11:2).
  53. “Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall” (Pr. 16:18).
  54. “An high look, and a proud heart, and the plowing of the wicked, is sin” (Pr. 21:4).
  55. “He that is of a proud heart stirreth up strife: but he that putteth his trust in the Lord shall be made fat” (Pr. 28:25).
  56. “A man’s pride shall bring him low: but honour shall uphold the humble in spirit” (Pr. 29:23).
  57. “For thou hast said in thine heart, I will ascend into heaven, I will exalt my throne above the stars of God: I will sit also upon the mount of the congregation, in the sides of the north: I will ascend above the heights of the clouds; I will be like the most High. Yet thou shalt be brought down to hell, to the sides of the pit” (Is. 14:13-15).
  58. “Though thou exalt thyself as the eagle, and though thou set thy nest among the stars, thence will I bring thee down, saith the Lord” (Ob. 4).
  59. Pride is more easily recognized than defined and is more easily detected in others than in oneself. The concept embraces many synonyms that reflect attitudes as well as acts — such as arrogance, presumption, conceit, and especially vanity and self- satisfaction. Pride is incessantly selfish, and a proud person thus loses any balance that might grow out of a recognition of one’s true position as over against God or over against the ability and worth of others. Since human nature is understood primarily in its dependence upon God and finds further fulfillment in its relationships with others, it follows that pride is a self- isolating and independent attitude that cuts a person off from necessary relationships and perverts true humanity; thus pride is sin. - From the definition of “ ride" in the Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible by Moises Silvia and Merrill C. Tenney.
  60. Boasting in self and exalting self over others are sins that will merit terrible judgment in the day of the Lord. When we exalt ourselves over others, we degrade, shame, and humiliate them.It is an overblown sense of self-importance that causes us to consider ourselves better than others. Feelings of being more appealing, more personable, more intelligent, more valuable, or of more worth than other people cause us to elevate ourselves and demean others. Self-exaltation causes rulers to stifle freedom, threaten war, and even enslave people. Deeming ourselves superior to others leads to all kinds of wicked and perverted behavior. Therefore God warns us against degrading people and tearing them down. God loves people, and He expects us to build up and help one another that we might all live fruitful and victorious lives. Listen to what God’s Holy Word says about boasting and exalting ourselves over other people:
    “And whosoever shall exalt himself shall be abased; and he that shall humble himself shall be exalted” (Mt. 23:12).

    “But now ye rejoice in your boastings: all such rejoicing is evil” (Js. 4:16).
    “They that trust in their wealth, and boast themselves in the multitude of their riches; None of them can by any means redeem his brother, nor give to God a ransom for him” (Ps. 49:6-7).
    “Boast not thyself of to morrow; for thou knowest not what a day may bring forth” (Pr. 27:1).
     - From the "Thought 1” reading from Isaiah 10:5 in the Preacher’s Outline and Sermon Bible Old and New Testament Commentary Set (44-Volumes) - by Alpha-Omega Ministries, Publisher: Leadership Ministries Worldwide
  61. Although pride usually is thought of as a character trait by which persons, for their own satisfaction, are constantly contrasting themselves to others, it is not really understood unless we realize that its very scorn of all others allows for no comparison or competition. It is a perversity of nature that is profoundly indifferent to the opinions and favors as well as the virtues of others. In this cold and hateful indifference it is most deadly. All satisfaction from pride is self- satisfaction, and it is endless:pride of evil, pride of goodness, pride of birth and position, even pride of humility. No moral suasion or guidance can break in because self- satisfaction always feels complete in itself. Augustine, Aquinas, and others make pride (as against selfishness, for example, or sensuality) the very essence of sin. - From the definition of “ ride" in the Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible by Moises Silvia and Merrill C. Tenney.
  62. “Love not the world, neither the things that are in the world. If any man love the world, the love of the Father is not in him. For all that is in the world, the lust of the flesh, and the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life, is not of the Father, but is of the world” (1 Jn. 2:15-16).
  63. The Peril of Pride - When the bull market is roaring and the economy is soaring, the tendency is to forget the Lord rather than to thank Him. “I’ve been a clever entrepreneur, a careful businessman, I’ve handled my money well—and look what I’ve accomplished. My business is going great; my bank account is growing; my car is new; my house is grand.” Oh, we’re too wise, too sophisticated to say this with our lips, but in our hearts, we say, “I’ve done alright.” “Beware,” Moses would say. The possessions we have—the gold, the silver, the portfolio, house, and car are all due to God’s grace exclusively. What you have, what I enjoy, what we possess is a gift from God to you and me not because of who we are but in spite of us!“But I’ve worked hard” you may say.Wait a minute. Who gave you the energy to work hard? Who gave you the ability to be wise? Sometimes we forget. Sometimes we say in our heart, “I’m pretty sharp.” But it’s nothing more than arrogance. Pride creeps in during times of prosperity. And pride is the only disease known to man that makes everyone sick except the one who has it. Everything we have and all that we enjoy is solely because of God’s grace—His unmerited, undeserved, unearned favor. - From commentary on Duteronomy 9:29 from Courson’sApplication Commentary by John Courson. 
  64. “Draw near to God and He will draw near to you” (James 4:8). What a wonderful invitation and what an incredible promise. It takes risk to reach out to another or to attempt to draw near to someone else. God has promised not to “back off.” He is always ready to respond appropriately to us with His love and grace.
    As we draw near to Him and allow Him to draw near to us, a marvelous thing takes place. Jesus refers to this phenomenon as “abiding” in Him and He in us (John 15:4–5). As we are possessed more and more by Christ Himself, His character increasingly supplants ours. We become more and more like Him. As we die to self and are filled with the Holy Spirit, the “fruit” of the Spirit flows from our lives. We become more and more like Jesus—including becoming more and more humble. His humility becomes ours. - From commentary on James 4:8 from The Preacher’s Commentary Series. Volumes 1-35: Genesis - Revelation by Stuart Briscoe. 
  65. The Lord created us to be dependent upon Him, but in numbering the people, David was attempting to assess his own success apart from the Lord. In Isaiah 14, we read the account of Satan’s downfall, and there we see that Satan himself fell because of pride. “I will be like God,” he said. And this is always the essence of pride. He didn’t say, “I will be greater than God,” or, “I will obliterate God, but simply, “I will be like God.”Pride says, “I can do it myself. I don’t need to seek the Lord. I can handle the bills and take care of my kids myself.” How can you know if you’ve succumbed to the sin of pride? The answer is quite simple: pride always manifests itself in prayerlessness. - From commentary on 1 Chronicles 21:4 from Courson’s Application Commentary by Jon Courson.
  66. Proverbs 16:17-19 - The highway of the upright is to depart from evil: he that keepeth his way preserveth his soul. Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall. Better it is to be of an humble spirit with the lowly, than to divide the spoil with the proud.
  67. Thought 1 - All people who are gripped by sinful pride and exalt themselves above others will face the judgment of God. This is especially true for leaders, who should be serving people, not neglecting or exploiting them. Listen to what God’s Word says about those who in their pride exalt themselves above others:
    “And whosoever shall exalt himself shall be abased; and he that shall humble himself shall be exalted” (Mt. 23:12).
    “He hath put down the mighty from their seats, and exalted them of low degree” (Lu. 1:52).
    “Look on every one that is proud, and bring him low; and tread down the wicked in their place” (Jb. 40:12).
    “A man's pride shall bring him low: but honour shall uphold the humble in spirit” (Pr. 29:23).
    “For the day of the Lord of hosts shall be upon every one that is proud and lofty, and upon every one that is lifted up; and he shall be brought low” (Is. 2:12).
    - From the "Thought 1” reading from Isaiah 22:15-195 in the Preacher’s Outline and Sermon Bible Old and New Testament Commentary Set (44-Volumes) - by Alpha-Omega Ministries, Publisher: Leadership Ministries Worldwide
  68. This kind of thinking runs absolutely counter to what our society says. Pride, masquerading as self- confidence, is lauded in our culture, while humility is stepped over if not stepped on altogether. But the story isn’t over, gang, for Peter tells us that the humble will be exalted in due time (1 Peter 5:6) and that it is the meek who are the true “beautiful people” (Psalm 149:4).- From commentary from CoursonApplication Commentary by Jon Courson.
  69. Proverbs 29:23 -  A man’s pride shall bring him low:but honour shall uphold the humble in spirit. That the Lord honors humility should not surprise us for people are innately drawn to the humble man, whereas they try to distance themselves from the proud know.  - From commentary from CoursonApplication Commentary by Jon Courson.
  70. Ecclesiastes 7:7-8 -  Surely oppression maketh a wise man mad; and a gift destroyeth the heart. Better is the end of a thing than the beginning thereof:and the patient in spirit is better than the proud in spirit.  I have this verse underlined in my Bible because, in my pride, I think I can accomplish certain tasks. But pride goes before destruction (Proverbs 16:18). Therefore, how much better it is to be patient, to not react, to not intervene, but just to wait. I’ve never regretted the times I’ve waited, the times I’ve refrained from offering my opinion—but how often I have regretted the times I’ve quickly rushed into situations, vainly thinking I knew all the answers. - From commentary from CoursonApplication Commentary by Jon Courson.
  71. Though thou exalt thyself as the eagle, and though thou set thy nest among the stars, thence will I bring thee down, saith the Lord” (Ob. 1:4).
  72. “For, behold, the day cometh, that shall burn as an oven; and all the proud, yea, and all that do wickedly, shall be stubble: and the day that cometh shall burn them up, saith the Lord of hosts, that it shall leave them neither root nor branch” (Mal. 4:1).
  73. God despises sinful pride. There is a legitimate pride and an illegitimate pride. Pride in oneself is essential for a healthy personality and a productive, fruitful life. All people should esteem themselves—but not too highly, for every person has weaknesses that must be acknowledged in order to strengthen them. An unacknowledged weakness will grow into a greater weakness. And the greater a weakness is, the more it will eat away at a person’s strength. For this reason we must never walk around arrogantly, exalting ourselves and denying our weaknesses.
    When we are always looking at ourselves, thinking only of our own affairs, we are being self-centered. We are 1 ourselves more important than others. To avoid this, we must give attention to the concerns of others. Walking humbly among others, acknowledging them, and being friendly with them pleases the Lord. No matter what our social position in life, no matter where we live or how much money we make, we are to acknowledge the dignity of all other human beings. Every human being is a living person with an immortal soul that is important to God. Therefore, we are to take an interest in and care for our fellow human beings. To esteem ourselves more highly than anyone else is sinful pride, and God despises it. - From the “Introduction to Section G” reading from Isaiah 23:1-18 in the Preacher’s Outline and Sermon Bible Old and New Testament Commentary Set (44-Volumes) - by Alpha-Omega Ministries, Publisher: Leadership Ministries Worldwide
  74. In this world, many of God’s people are looked upon as insignificant and unimportant. Because of their righteous lives and witness for the Lord, they are usually considered a thorn in the side of society. For this reason, the unbelievers of the world oppress and persecute them. They are poor, needy, and powerless. But the day is coming when all proud unbelievers will be humbled and all arrogant cities will be leveled to the ground. In that day the poor and needy believers of the world will be exalted.
    “And whosoever shall exalt himself shall be abased; and he that shall humble himself shall be exalted” (Mt. 23:12).
    “He hath put down the mighty from their seats, and exalted them of low degree” (Lu. 1:52).
    “And he said unto him, Well, thou good servant: because thou hast been faithful in a very little, have thou authority over ten cities” (Lu. 19:17). 
    - From the “Thought 1" reading from Isaiah 26:5-7 in the Preacher’s Outline and Sermon Bible Old and New Testament Commentary Set (44-Volumes) - by Alpha-Omega Ministries, Publisher: Leadership Ministries Worldwide
  75. Pride can be good as well as evil. In fact, a degree of pride is essential for self-confidence and self-esteem. Scripture says that we are to love our neighbors as ourselves (Mt. 5:43; 19:19; 22:39). Loving ourselves, taking pride in who we are and what we do, is a sign of a healthy personality.
    But pride can become evil. Pride is evil when we begin to elevate ourselves above others and think of ourselves more highly than we should. It is evil when we begin to think that we are superior or indispensable to others, or that we are more important or more deserving of attention and honor than they are. Any arrogant or haughty spirit that degrades others is evil.
    Pride also becomes sinful when we look upon man’s works as the foundation and security of our lives. For no matter what man constructs or develops—a building, business, city, nation, economic wealth, or military power—it is not permanent. It can be destroyed. Neither man nor the works of his hands offer lasting or satisfying security. The spirit of man cannot find long-term contentment or fulfillment in people or possessions. The human soul is restless until it rests in God. This was the message of the Lord to the Northern Kingdom of Israel, but they rejected the offer of God’s rest and peace and, as a result, they faced His judgment.
    If we walk through life in sinful pride, boasting and placing our security in ourselves and in the works of our hands, we too will face the judgment of God. 
    - From the “Thought 1" reading from Isaiah 28:11-12 in the Preacher’s Outline and Sermon Bible Old and New Testament Commentary Set (44-Volumes) - by Alpha-Omega Ministries, Publisher: Leadership Ministries Worldwide
  76. The Lord hears the prayers of the humble and exalts them. He revives the spirit of the humble and contrite. But He lowers or puts down the proud and shuts His ears to their prayers.
    “And whosoever shall exalt himself shall be abased; and he that shall humble himself shall be exalted” (Mt. 23:12).
    “For thus saith the high and lofty One that inhabiteth eternity, whose name is Holy; I dwell in the high and holy place, with him also that is of a contrite and humble spirit, to revive the spirit of the humble, and to revive the heart of the contrite ones” (Is. 57:15). 
     From the reading from Isaiah 38:9-22 in the Preacher’s Outline and Sermon Bible Old and New Testament Commentary Set (44-Volumes) - by Alpha-Omega Ministries, Publisher: Leadership Ministries Worldwide
  77. Pride is a terrible evil. When a person begins to look upon himself as being superior to or better than others, he…
    • exalts himself over others, applauding his own efforts
    • feels that he should be preferred over others
    • considers himself to be more valuable than others
    A person who is full of pride and self-exaltation is often arrogant, overbearing, and disrespectful. He frequently puts other people down, degrades, shames, embarrasses, stifles, harms, subjects, and in some cases even enslaves others. For this reason, God strongly condemns pride and the exalting of ourselves above others:

    “And whosoever shall exalt himself shall be abased; and he that shall humble himself shall be exalted” (Mt. 23:12).
    “Be of the same mind one toward another. Mind not high things, but condescend to men of low estate. Be not wise in your own conceits” (Ro. 12:16).
    “And if any man think that he knoweth any thing, he knoweth nothing yet as he ought to know” (1 Co. 8:2).
    “For if a man think himself to be something, when he is nothing, he deceiveth himself” (Ga. 6:3).
    “But he giveth more grace. Wherefore he saith, God resisteth the proud, but giveth grace unto the humble” (Js. 4:6).
    “For all that is in the world, the lust of the flesh, and the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life, is not of the Father, but is of the world” (1 Jn. 2:16). 
     - From the “Thought 1"reading from Isaiah 39 in the Preacher’s Outline and Sermon Bible Old and New Testament Commentary Set (44-Volumes) - by Alpha-Omega Ministries, Publisher: Leadership Ministries Worldwide