Repentance

  1. What is repentance? Repentance is not morbid introspection. It is not self-punishment. True repentance is a privilege, given by the Holy Spirit, opening our eyes not only to how costly our sins are but, more searchingly, how evil our sins are.  1 Repentance is not afraid of wholesome self-suspicion, because it feels an urgency to be right with God at any cost. Repentance is a power giving us traction for newness of life. It isn’t piecemeal or selective, doctoring up this problem or that. - From Isaiah: God Loves Sinners Location 480 in Kindle book by Raymond C. Ortlund, Jr.
  2.  Many men find confession especially difficult because it cuts at our dignity and self-worth. When we confess we admit our mistakes and failures. We assume that these admissions don’t make us look very good. However, God loves to see us confess and repent of our sin, because in doing so we show that we desire to turn to him. When we’re “man enough” to confess our wrongs, God can choose to pour out his blessings for the next phase of our lives. - From the April 12, 2016 NIV Devotions for Men from the new NIV Men’s Devotional Bible by Zondervan
  3. “The whole life of believers should be penitence.”2 Repentance is an honest new self renouncing the shifty old self. And, as Isaiah teaches here, repentance turns from mere forms of worship, whatever they are, to authenticity with God. - From Isaiah: God Loves Sinners Location 485 in Kindle book  by Raymond C. Ortlund, Jr.
  4. Proverbs 28:13 - Whoever conceals his transgressions will not prosper, but he who confesses and forsakes them will obtain mercy.  - The proud sinner naturally wants to be thought better than he is. His sin he must conceal.  Confession of sins to God is the first act of the penitent. But it should also be the daily habit of the saint. The further we advance, the deeper will be the tone of confession. The moment sin is seen to be sin, let it be laid on the Surety's head. Every moment of unconfessed sin adds to its burden and guilt. The thought of a nature estranged from God, a heart full of corruption, sins of youth and age, before and after conversion, sins against light and conviction, knowledge and love, the sins of our very confession, their defilement, coldness, and too often self-righteous tendency - all supply abundant material for abasing acknowledgment. See the greatness, not the smallness, of our sin. Never deem any sin so trifling as not to need the immediate attention of the blood of atonement. Genuine conviction gives no rest, until by the believing apprehension of this remedy the peace of God is firmly fixed in the conscience. As Bunyan so accurately pictured, not at the wicket-gate but at the sign of the cross did Christian find the grave of sin. Here it is lost, forgotten, never to be found. From Crossway Classic Commentary - Proverbs by Charles Bridges
  5. A deep conviction of unworthiness is necessary for us to serve the Lord. We must not measure ourselves against one another, for we are all of the same flesh and blood. We are all guilty of giving in to temptation, sinning through acts of commission or omission. Therefore, when we measure ourselves against one another, we are as good as everyone else. But to learn the truth about ourselves, we must measure ourselves against the Lord. When we see the Lord high and exalted, dwelling in the blazing holiness of His being, then we see the truth. We see just how far short of God’s glory we are, how terrible our sin is when contrasted with His perfection and glory (Ro. 3:23). The result of this comparison is just what we need: a deep conviction of sin and of unworthiness. Hence, we are driven—or should be driven—to seek forgiveness from the Lord, the only source of true forgiveness. And when the Lord pardons us, we are truly freed. Guilt is erased, and our spirits are set free from depression, 1, self-accusation, and the sense of failure. We are set free from the heavy weight of guilt that causes so many emotional problems, problems that far too often crush us and make us helpless, unable to function. Jesus Christ—He and He alone—can and will set us free if we will confess and repent of our sins. In addition, confession and repentance are absolutely essential before we can genuinely serve the Lord. 
    “Repent ye therefore, and be converted, that your sins may be blotted out, when the times of refreshing shall come from the presence of the Lord” (Ac. 3:19).
    “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness” (1 Jn. 1:9).
    “He that covereth his sins shall not prosper: but whoso confesseth and forsaketh them shall have mercy” (Pr. 28:13)
    .
    - From the Thought 1 reading from Isaiah 6:5 in the Preacher’s Outline and Sermon Bible Old and New Testament Commentary Set (44-Volumes) - by Alpha-Omega Ministries, Publisher: Leadership Ministries Worldwide

  6. Repentance is an old English word that describes a willingness to turn from sin toward Jesus Christ. It literally means a complete U- turn on the road of life—a change of heart and a change of mind. It means a willingness to follow Jesus Christ and receive him as Savior and Lord. In the words of Christ, “The time has come.... The kingdom of God is near. Repent and believe the good news!” (Mark 1:15)
    The second step is receive. To demonstrate true belief means to be willing to receive God’s free gift. To truly receive God’s gift is to trust in and depend on Jesus Christ alone to be the Lord of our lives here and now and our Savior for all eternity.  - From Resurrection: Capstone in the Arch of Christianity by Hank Hannegraft 
  7. Trying to hide sin from God interrupts and weakens your relationship with Him.  When you confess what you've done and sincerely ask for God’s forgiveness, the distance closes and your relationship heals.  God doesn’t put a statute of limitations on sin, so any obstacles you put in the way of your relationship with him remain there until you take action to remove them.  However, if you’re sincere about wanting God’s forgiveness, you’ll receive it. - From page 683 Devotional reading called “Coming Clean from the New Men’s Devotional Bible (NIV Version) by Zondervan.
  8. “Your unconfessed sins make your worship unendurable to me, because your sins reveal what you really think of me.” So, which claims the greater sense of urgency in our hearts — the form of our worship or the quality of our lives? Are we at least as eager to repent of our sins as we are to preserve our form of worship, whatever it may be? Where does our sense of urgency lie? - From Isaiah: God Loves Sinners Location 534 in Kindle book  by Raymond C. Ortlund, Jr.
  9. Acts 3:19- 21 - Repent, then, and turn to God, so that your sins may be wiped out, that times of refreshing may come from the Lord, and that he may send the Christ, who has been appointed for you—even Jesus. He must remain in heaven until the time comes for God to restore everything, as he promised long ago through his holy prophets.
  10. Psalms 32:1Blessed is the one whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered.  When we confess our sins, God cancels the debt, and it’s no longer on the books. As the children say, “It doesn’t count anymore.” Why? Because Jesus paid the debt on the cross and His blood cleanses the record and the heart of the offender. The forgiveness of the Lord is certainly something to sing about! It’s unfortunate that too many of God’s children take it for granted. - From the BE Series Commentary by Warren Wiersby.
  11. “Remove the evil of your deeds from before my eyes.” Repentance is not just removing evil deeds; it goes the second mile and, after the deeds have passed, goes back to clean up the residual evil, the damage done. True repentance makes things right again. God is saying, “If you want your worship to please me, do this. Become actively creative in compassion and justice for the people you have hurt, especially the people nobody else cares about, people who can’t pay you back, people who might not thank you. Set right again the wrongs you’ve been tolerating. Then your worship will be beautiful to me, and then I will be real to you again.”  - From Isaiah: God Loves Sinners Location 565 in Kindle book  by Raymond C. Ortlund, Jr.
  12. Have you repented? God looks upon you as if you had not offended. He becomes a friend, a father. He will now bring forth the best robe and put it on you. God is pacified towards you and will, with the father of the prodigal, fall upon your neck and kiss you. . . . Have you been penitentially humbled? The Lord will never upbraid you with your former sins. After Peter wept, we never read that Christ upbraided him with his denial of him. God has cast your sins into the depth of the sea. How? Not as cork, but as lead. . . . O the music of conscience! Conscience is turned into a paradise, and there a Christian sweetly solaces himself and plucks the flowers of joy. The repenting sinner can go to God with boldness in prayer and look upon him not as a Judge but as a Father. He is born of God and is heir to a kingdom. He is encircled with promises. He no sooner shakes the tree of the promise but some fruit falls. - From location 594 in the Kindle Book -  Isaiah: God Loves Sinners  by Raymond C. Ortlund, Jr.
  13. Even in the face of judgment there is always hope for salvation. God gave the people of Cush ample warning of the coming devastation. They had one last opportunity to turn to the Lord, to cry out in repentance, yet they did not. Likewise, we have heard the warning about evil associations. We have heard that judgment is coming. Thus we still have time to call upon the Lord for deliverance. The gift of salvation is there for the taking, but we must step forward to receive it!
    “For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved” (Ro. 10:13). 
    - From “An Overview of the Prophesies against the Nations" reading from Isaiah 13:1 in the Preacher’s Outline and Sermon Bible Old and New Testament Commentary Set (44-Volumes) - by Alpha-Omega Ministries, Publisher: Leadership Ministries Worldwide
  14. Regrets are not the same as genuine repentance. Anyone can feel bad for what he or she has done. The repentant resolves to learn from it. Better, the repentant sinner hears God’s call to become a disciple and be taught by God. God’s offer is really an invitation to fellowship with the One we’ve wronged. This is forgiveness squared! You may go from being an enemy of God to a friend of God, who offers to “guide you along the best pathway for your life,” who will “advise you and watch over you.”  - Patterson, Ben (2008-09-22). God's Prayer Book: The Power and Pleasure of Praying the Psalms (p. 106). Tyndale House Publishers - A. Kindle Edition. 
  15. Psalm 32:5 - I acknowledged my sin to you, and I did not cover my iniquity; I said, “I will confess my transgressions to the LORD,” and you forgave the iniquity of my sin. Guilt is to the conscience what pain is to the body: It tells us that something is wrong and must be made right, or things will get worse. The promise is for everybody (“godly” = chosen ones, God’s people; 4:3), and we must confess our sins immediately when we find them out and while God may be found (69:14; Isa. 55:9; Prov. 1:24-33). The waters of chastening will only get deeper and the storm increase, so don’t tempt the Lord! But God’s forgiveness isn’t a negative thing; the Lord adds positive blessings to help us on the road to recovery. - From the BE Series Commentary by Warren Wiersby.
  16. God does not redeem us by casually sweeping his standards aside. God pays the price demanded by his own justice and righteousness. This is the magnitude of his achievement at the cross of Christ. Redemption comes not by God’s leniency but by his justice and righteousness fully satisfied in Christ. The Bible says that “our great God and Savior Jesus Christ . . . gave himself for us to redeem us from all lawlessness and to purify for himself a people for his own possession” (Titus 2:13, 14). We are redeemed at a cost to God that we will never understand. At the cross he put the real moral guilt of sinners onto Christ, the perfect substitute. God honored his own moral government of the universe. Our part, Isaiah tells us, is to repent: “. . . and those in her who repent.” - From location 702 in the Kindle Book -  Isaiah: God Loves Sinners  by Raymond C. Ortlund, Jr.
  17. We add nothing to the value of Jesus’ sacrifice, but his love does claim all that we are. The flip side of God paying the price is that we are no longer our own (1 Corinthians 6:19b, 20a). What else can we do but repent? We need to repent of our sins every day. We need to repent of our fifth-rate righteousness every day. We need to receive afresh, with the empty hands of faith, real righteousness from Jesus Christ every day. The cross becomes a redeeming power for us as we learn what it means to repent. - From location 708 in the Kindle Book -  Isaiah: God Loves Sinners  by Raymond C. Ortlund, Jr.
  18. There is no way around repentance. The only alternative is in verse 28: “But rebels and sinners shall be broken together, and those who forsake the LORD shall be consumed.” That is the decision before us. Will we repent and be redeemed, or rebel and be consumed? God will redeem his people, and he wants to redeem you and me. He has already paid the price at the cross. The question is, will we turn to God in repentance, even if he leads us into a refining fire (v. 25)? If we decide against repentance, we will be consumed. If we decide for repentance, we will be redeemed. - From location 712 in the Kindle Book -  Isaiah: God Loves Sinners  by Raymond C. Ortlund, Jr.
  19. What makes worship acceptable, through Christ, is repentance — in other words, cleaning up our lives with compassion toward people and tenderness toward God. - From location 592 in the Kindle Book -  Isaiah: God Loves Sinners  by Raymond C. Ortlund, Jr.
  20. God is saying, “Every moment of your life matters to me. Your choices have lasting repercussions. That’s why I am confronting you with the truth.”  - From location 724 in the Kindle Book -  Isaiah: God Loves Sinners  by Raymond C. Ortlund, Jr.
  21. Our first problem is that our attitude toward sin is more self-centered than God-centered. We are more concerned about our own "victory" over sin than we are about the fact that our sins grieve the heart of God. We cannot tolerate failure in our struggle with sin chiefly because we are success-oriented, not because we know it is offensive to God.  - From the Kindle book "In Pursuit of Holiness" by Jerry Bridges, location 93.
  22. Forgiveness is not automatic. If we want to be forgiven, we must recognize and repent of our sins: “He who conceals his sins does not prosper, but whoever confesses and renounces them finds mercy” (Proverbs 28:13). Forgiveness is established by our confession: “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness” (1 John 1:9).  - From location 840 of the Kindle Book "Heaven" by Randy Alcorn
  23. Even in the face of judgment there is always hope for salvation. Remember that all trials are not necessarily judgments from God. Carelessness causes some hardships, while other misfortunes are the natural result of living in a fallen world. In this corrupt world we are subject to all kinds of accidents and diseases. But when we deliberately sin, God will judge us. He will discipline us in order to correct us and keep us from harming ourselves or injuring other people. Because God loves us, He will do all He can to keep us from continuing in sin and darkness and shame.
    When we sin, we will suffer as a result of it. We will bear some trial, some pain, some suffering. But in the midst of judgment there is hope. Even while we are suffering the judgment of God, He will deliver us if we will turn back to Him. As Scripture says, if we will judge ourselves, we will not be judged. If we will confess our sins, He will forgive and cleanse us. He will accept us back into His favor and restore the joy of our salvation. He will once again empower us to live fruitful and victorious lives. Infusing us with His presence and strength, He will enable us to overcome all the trials and temptations that confront us. Listen to the wonderful hope promised by God’s Holy Word:

    “And it shall come to pass, that whosoever shall call on the name of the Lord shall be saved” (Ac. 2:21).
    “For we are saved by hope: but hope that is seen is not hope: for what a man seeth, why doth he yet hope for?” (Ro. 8:24).
    “For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved” (Ro. 10:13).
    “For whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning, that we through patience and comfort of the scriptures might have hope” (Ro. 15:4).
    “For the hope which is laid up for you in heaven, whereof ye heard before in the word of the truth of the gospel” (Col. 1:5).
    “Teaching us that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly, righteously, and godly, in this present world; Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ” (Tit. 2:12-13). 
    - From the “Thought 1” reading from Isaiah 18:1-7 in the Preacher’s Outline and Sermon Bible Old and New Testament Commentary Set (44-Volumes) - by Alpha-Omega Ministries, Publisher: Leadership Ministries Worldwide
  24. The New Testament does not distinguish clearly between sins of ignorance and sins committed willfully. Hesitant, fearful sinners as well as stubborn, hard-headed sinners can find forgiveness in Jesus by repentance and faith. The promise that God “will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness” (1 John 1:9) is available for all who confess their sins. - From the Kindle Book "the Holman New Testament Commentary - Hebrews 6,  at location 2499.
  25. God will pardon all who truly repent. It is possible for human beings so to resist the grace of God that they arrive at a state of heart in which repentance is an impossibility. It is not impossible because God would not be willing to bring them to repentance, but it is impossible because the person is so hardened he will not repent. This condition is described in Romans 1:28. People become so completely sinful that God gives them up to a reprobate heart.  - From the Kindle Book "the Holman New Testament Commentary - Hebrews 6, v. 6 at location 2771.
  26. In the popular mind, repentance describes sorrow for sin. We can, however, be sorry for sin for the wrong reason. Our sorrow can come because someone caught us in the act of sin or because we feel humiliated by what we have done. True repentance is deeper than mere sorrow for sin.  - From the Kindle Book "the Holman New Testament Commentary - Hebrews 6, VI.  Deeper Discoveries, A. Repentance (v. 1), at location 2959.
  27. Repentance is a spiritual and moral change of attitude toward God which turns an individual from sin to God. The act of repentance may cause sorrow, but it must cause a turning from sin. - From the Kindle Book "the Holman New Testament Commentary - Hebrews 6, VI.  Deeper Discoveries, A. Repentance (v. 1), at location 2962.
  28. Christians who fall into sin and disobedience break their fellowship with God, but they never lose their position in his family.  Confession of sin can restore this fellowship (1 John 1:9).  - From the Kindle Book "the Holman New Testament Commentary - Hebrews 10 IV Deeper Discoveries, A. Cleansing (v 2.)  at location 4693. 
  29. Restructuring a company resembles personal repentance.  Repentance demands restructuring your life around the new demands of Jesus Christ.  This, however, is not the popular understanding of repentance.  For some people, repentance means to feel sad about sin.  They think it means to weep, to express sorrow, and to feel glum about the past. People who repent do not merely cry over their sins.  They change their lives by God's grace.  They do not continue to go over the same failures time and time again.  They put these failures behind them and get on with the task of living in obedience to God. - From the Kindle Book "the Holman New Testament Commentary - Hebrews 12, IV.  Life Application, What Big Business Can Teach Us About Repentance, at location 5463.
  30. Three features about repentance are important for us to consider.  First, repentance involves a commitment to live as a follower of Jesus Christ.  The biblical word for "repent" demands a change of mind about God, self, and sin which produces a changed life.  People who truly repent will live out the life of Jesus in their bodies.  They will tap into God's power to do what their own will power could never accomplish. Second, repentance
  31. The word "repent" (metanoeo) literally means "to change the mind." However, a change of mind is suspect if it does not result in a change of behavior, as John made clear to the hypocrites in Matthew 3:8.  The same principal is echoed in James 2:14:26.  Just as "faith" without works in not faith at all, so "repentance" without its fruit is not authentic.  Repentance in Scripture refers to a decision to turn one's sins because of an inward "mind-change" which involves how we look at God as well as how we look at sin.   - From the Holman New Testament Commentary "Matthew" by Max Anders and Stuart K. Weber, page 33.
  32. None of us have yet been snatched from this world. We are still living, and God’s hand of mercy is still reaching out to us. If we are sinking into the depths of sin and shame, darkness and doom, hearing this message may be our last hope. The Arabians had only a year before most of them would die. All of us must die, and for some of us death is just over the horizon, perhaps even within the next 24 hours. Most of us will never know the hour or day we are destined to leave the world. Thus, being alert, standing watch, and being prepared to meet the Lord is an urgent need for many of us. If we have never turned to Him, we must turn to Him today, right now, for our own protection. When we turn to Him, He immediately reaches out and accepts us. Listen to what His Holy Word says:
    “Repent ye therefore, and be converted, that your sins may be blotted out, when the times of refreshing shall come from the presence of the Lord” (Ac. 3:19).
    “For ye were as sheep going astray; but are now returned unto the Shepherd and Bishop of your souls” (1 Pe. 2:25).
    “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness” (1 Jn. 1:9).
    “If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land” (2 Chr. 7:14). 
    “He that covereth his sins shall not prosper: but whoso confesseth and forsaketh them shall have mercy” (Pr. 28:13).
    “Let the wicked forsake his way, and the unrighteous man his thoughts: and let him return unto the Lord, and he will have mercy upon him; and to our God, for he will abundantly pardon” (Is. 55:7).“
    But if the wicked will turn from all his sins that he hath committed, and keep all my statutes, and do that which is lawful and right, he shall surely live, he shall not die” (Eze. 18:21).
    - From the “Thought 1” reading from Isaiah 21:13-1-7 in the Preacher’s Outline and Sermon Bible Old and New Testament Commentary Set (44-Volumes) - by Alpha-Omega Ministries, Publisher: Leadership Ministries Worldwide
  33. Repentance is good for you - you have to change the heart attitude.  - From the Holman New Testament Commentary "Matthew" by Max Anders and Stuart K. Weber, page 55.
  34. Forgiveness of sins comes only through repentance.  Repentance involves a change in lifestyle, not just a momentary feeling or statement. Christ's ministry was to bring the Holy Spirit to people and to bring judgment on those who refused to repent and believe in him.  Confess your sins, repent and ask God for forgiveness.  Ask God to show you the changes repentance should bring in your daily life.  Change your life in the ways God shows you. Let God teach you to be content. - From the Holman New Testament Commentary "Mark" by Max Anders and Trent C. Butler, page 52.
  35. Repentance can be defined as "turning."  To repent is to turn from a life of sin to a life directed by God.  John the Baptist put more into the term.  To him, repentance meant caring for other people more than yourself, being fair in your dealings with other people even at personal sacrifice.  Repentance meant giving up any reason to feel secure and satisfied with your relationship with God.  Repentance recognizes God's call on one's life and life's inability to sustain itself in the face of God's call and God's coming judgment.  Thus, a repentant person chooses to prepare for judgment by changing his or her lifestyle.  One who repents feels personal responsibility before God rather than personal success in view of life.  - From the Holman New Testament Commentary "Luke" by Max Anders and Trent C. Butler, IV. Deeper Discoveries, A. Baptism of Repentance for the Forgiveness of Sins (3:3), page 54.
  36. Our hearts become polluted with unresolved issues and old grudges when we allow someone else to get under our skin. Obviously, we didn’t choose to be hurt, betrayed, or offended, but we always have a choice about how we react. And God makes it crystal clear how we must respond if we want to enjoy life: it’s summed up by the word forgiveness.  - From location 1097 in the Kindle Book "Fresh Air" by Chris Hodges.
  37. But there is also wonderful news in the Lord’s coming judgment. Note God’s purpose for destroying the cities of the world: to stir up the Gentiles to repent of their sins and worship Him. For those who repent, there will be salvation. The Father will accept them because they approach Him through His Son, the Lord Jesus Christ. But for those who reject Him, there will be only judgment. They will stand before the Lord Jesus Christ in judgment and bow the knee, acknowledging that He is truly the Son of the living God. After bowing the knee, they will face the judgment of God because of their defiance and refusal to repent. - From the  reading from Isaiah 25:2-3 in the Preacher’s Outline and Sermon Bible Old and New Testament Commentary Set (44-Volumes) - by Alpha-Omega Ministries, Publisher: Leadership Ministries Worldwide
  38. If we don’t forgive others, we’re only hurting ourselves, not them. As the old adage reminds us, “Unforgiveness is like drinking poison and expecting someone else to die.” Our unwillingness to forgive other people will keep us from experiencing and receiving the forgiveness our Father extends to us. If we’re so obsessed with exacting revenge or getting an apology from someone who’s hurt us, then we’re missing the point of God’s grace. - From location 1099 in the Kindle Book "Fresh Air" by Chris Hodges.
  39. Of course, the prayer of repentance is acceptable to God. He delights in hearing the cries of penitent sinners. But repentance involves not only sorrow for sin, but the turning away from wrong-doing, and the learning to do well. A repentance which does not produce a change in character and conduct, is a mere sham, which should deceive nobody. Old things must pass away, all things must become new. - From location 668 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  40. They failed to repent of sin (Isaiah v. 12). Throughout history, God’s judgment has fallen upon His people for a very specific purpose: to arouse them to weep in sorrow for their sins and to call upon Him for forgiveness. Through judgment the Lord calls upon His people to repent and to turn back to Him, the only living and true God.
    Thought 1. When we sin, God chastises us. The purpose for His discipline is always to move us to repent before we harm ourselves or others. Sin always damages us and often leads us to injure others. Think, for example, about the injuries caused in accidents by drunken drivers. God loves us, and because He does, He disciplines us in order to correct us.
    And ye have forgotten the exhortation which speaketh unto you as unto children, My son, despise not thou the chastening of the Lord, nor faint when thou art rebuked of him: For whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth, and scourgeth every son whom he receiveth” (He. 12:5-6).
    “As many as I love, I rebuke and chasten: be zealous therefore, and repent” (Re. 3:19).
    “Thou shalt also consider in thine heart, that, as a man chasteneth his son, so the Lord thy God chasteneth thee” (De. 8:5).
    “Blessed is the man whom thou chastenest, O Lord, and teachest him out of thy law” (Ps. 94:12).
    My son, despise not the chastening of the Lord; neither be weary of his correction: For whom the Lord loveth he correcteth; even as a father the son in whom he delighteth” (Pr. 3:11-12).
    “O Lord, I know that the way of man is not in himself: it is not in man that walketh to direct his steps. O Lord, correct me, but with judgment; not in thine anger, lest thou bring me to nothing” (Je. 10:23-24). 
    - From the “Thought 1” reading from Isaiah 22:12 in the Preacher’s Outline and Sermon Bible Old and New Testament Commentary Set (44-Volumes) - by Alpha-Omega Ministries, Publisher: Leadership Ministries Worldwide
  41. When we confess sin on a regular basis, we keep ourselves in a state of brokenness- in the best sense of that word. Our character is being conformed to the image of Christ. Our spirit is supple and responsive to God's leadings. God can use us. On the contrary, when we are not confessing sin as a daily habit, we are living in a state of unbrokenness. Telltale signs of this include pride, irritability, impatience, insensitivity, and resentment in relation to others- as well as indifference toward God. - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  42. When we are in the habit of confessing sin and throwing ourselves on the mercy of God, he pours out so much grace on us that it spills over into the lives of others. Broken people are a blessing to be around.  - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  43. Distinction between repentance and regret. Regret often means, “I’m sorry for all this trouble,” while repentance always means, “I’m sorry for my sin, and I propose to turn from that path and follow God in obedience and holiness.”  Regret says, “I’m sorry I got caught.”  Repentance says, “I’m sorry I sinned.”  If you have sinned and are vacillating between regret and repentance, read Paul’s full explanation in 2 Corinthians 7 and choose wisely. - From the Fenruary 27th daily devotional found on page 60 of "Turning Points With God, 365 Daily Devotions” by David Jeremiah.
  44. “To do so no more is the truest repentance - Martin Luther.
  45. Only the Lord can meet the needs of the human heart. The rebellious can find the rest, quietness, and confidence they seek in Him and Him alone. He is the only answer to lack of purpose, fulfillment, and assurance about the future. He alone is the cure for emptiness, loneliness, insecurity, and fear.
    God made our hearts to be restless until they find rest in Him. It is this restlessness that arouses us to seek Him, to acknowledge and have fellowship with Him. When we are in fellowship with God, we can worship, share, and talk with Him day by day. But before the Lord will accept and fellowship with us, before He will give us peace and assurance, we must repent of our sins and turn back to Him. Listen to what God’s Holy Word says about repentance:
    “Then Peter said unto them, Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost” (Ac. 2:38).
    “Repent ye therefore, and be converted, that your sins may be blotted out, when the times of refreshing shall come from the presence of the Lord” (Ac. 3:19). 
    “If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land” (2 Chr. 7:14).  
    “Let the wicked forsake his way, and the unrighteous man his thoughts: and let him return unto the Lord, and he will have mercy upon him; and to our God, for he will abundantly pardon” (Is. 55:7).
    “Return, ye backsliding children, and I will heal your backslidings. Behold, we come unto thee; for thou art the Lord our God” (Je. 3:22).
    “Cast away from you all your transgressions, whereby ye have transgressed; and make you a new heart and a new spirit: for why will ye die, O house of Israel?” (Eze. 18:31). 
    From the "Thought 1” reading from Isaiah 29:15-17 in the Preacher’s Outline and Sermon Bible Old and New Testament Commentary Set (44-Volumes)  - by Alpha-Omega Ministries, Publisher: Leadership Ministries Worldwide
  46. “Let the wicked forsake his way, and the unrighteous man his thoughts: and let him return unto the Lord, and he will have mercy upon him; and to our God, for he will abundantly pardon” (Is. 55:7).
  47. God extends an invitation to those who ignore and rebel against Him. Note what Isaiah said about the person who rebels: he is gripped by a deep or great rebellion. This indicates that God excludes no one from His invitation. He is willing to save from His coming judgment even those who have greatly rebelled against Him.
    What is the invitation God extends? It is to repent, to turn back to the Lord. Since God saves His people from their enemies, all who are in rebellion should repent and return to Him. God’s salvation is so wonderful that anyone who does not turn back to the Lord is a fool (Ps. 14:1-7; 53:1-6).
    The evidence of repentance is obvious. People who truly repent turn away from idolatry and worship the Lord alone. Note the phrase in that day, which refers to the latter days of human history when Christ sets up His kingdom on earth. In that day all idols will be cast down, false worship will cease, and the Lord alone will be worshipped. Isaiah’s message was forceful: since the glorious day of the Lord’s exaltation and worship is coming, everyone should renounce idolatry now. They should reject all idols and false worship now. The Lord is the only living and true God, so He should be the only object of man’s worship now. There should be a total renunciation of idolatry and false worship and a total recommitment to worship the Lord alone.
    But there is another reason for repenting and turning back to the Lord: He promises to deliver His people from their enemies (vv. 8-9). 
    - From the reading from Isaiah 31:6-9 in the Preacher’s Outline and Sermon Bible Old and New Testament Commentary Set (44-Volumes)  - by Alpha-Omega Ministries, Publisher: Leadership Ministries Worldwide
  48. “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness” (1 Jn. 1:9).
  49. God calls on all people everywhere to repent. Even if we have ignored and denied the Lord all our lives, the Lord extends an invitation to us: repent and turn back to Him. Repentance is absolutely essential if we are to escape the judgment that is coming upon the earth. If we fail to repent, we will face the terrifying judgment of God. Life is uncertain. No person is guaranteed another day of life. God’s Spirit does not always convict and draw people to Him; that is, He will not strive with people continuously, endlessly (Ge. 6:3). Man can reach a point of no return. Therefore, when God’s Spirit convicts us of sin and of failing to trust the Lord, we must confess and repent. We must turn back to Him. If we confess our sins and distrust, He will cleanse us and give us a deep sense of assurance that we have been forgiven. The assurance of His acceptance and favor will flood our souls. God extends His great invitation to every human being: repent and turn back to Him.
    “I tell you, Nay: but, except ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish” (Lu. 13:3).
    “Then Peter said unto them, Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost” (Ac. 2:38).
    - From the”Thought 1" reading from Isaiah 31:6-9 in the Preacher’s Outline and Sermon Bible Old and New Testament Commentary Set (44-Volumes)  - by Alpha-Omega Ministries, Publisher: Leadership Ministries Worldwide