Prayer/Worship - Section 4

  1. A lack of ardor in prayer, is the sure sign of a lack of depth and of intensity of desire; and the absence of intense desire is a sure sign of God's absence from the heart! To abate fervor is to retire from God. He can, and does, tolerate many things in the way of infirmity and error in his children. He can, and will pardon sin when the penitent prays, but two things are intolerable to him-insincerity and lukewarmness. Lack of heart and lack of heat are two things he loathes.  - From location 397 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  2. James 4:6 - Wherefore he saith, God resisteth the proud, but giveth grace unto the humble.  Although God has grace to give to us to resist the temptation or to recover from the situation, there’s no room for pride…..If I don’t pray in a given day, it is the ultimate indication of pride because it is the proud person who says, “I don’t need to pray about it. I can handle it.” Oh, I may not be cocky like Dennis Rodman or Mike Tyson, but if I’m not praying, I’m every bit as proud as they are because prayerlessness is the truest indicator of pride. - From Courson's Application Commentary by Jon Courson.
  3. Not only can we fail to pray personally but also we can fail to pray properly:"Ye ask, and receive not, because ye ask amiss, that ye may consume it upon your lusts" (4:3). The word for "amiss" is kakos. The word means "depraved," that which is bad in its very nature. Prayer is not a magic incantation guaranteed to get us whatever our hearts desire. Prayer has its rules. It must be in accordance with God's will (Matt. 26:39). It must be in faith (Matt. 21:22). It must come from a pure heart because God says that if we regard iniquity in our heart, He will not hear us (Ps. 66:18). It must be in the name of the Lord Jesus (John 14:13- 14; 15:16). And it must be fervent (James 5:16). - From commentary on James 4:2c-3 from the John Phillips Commentary Series (27 volumes) from Kregal Publisher
  4. The organic union of the Body of Christ is rooted in the loving union of the Trinity: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Together, the “community” of God helps us pray. In fact, we are drawn up into the communion of the Godhead when we pray. Jesus, the Son, teaches us to pray to the Father and intercedes for us as we do. The Spirit also helps us to pray, as something of a translator. In our weakness we don’t know what God wants us to pray for.  
    The Holy Spirit prays for us with groanings that cannot be expressed in words. And the Father who knows all hearts knows what the Spirit is saying, for the Spirit pleads for us believers in harmony with God’s own will. Patterson, Ben (2008-09-22). God's Prayer Book: The Power and Pleasure of Praying the Psalms (p. 17). Tyndale House Publishers - A. Kindle Edition. 
  5. If you stopped asking God to change your external circumstances and prayed instead a prayer of surrender, asking Him to change you, what do you think would happen? What keeps you from praying this kind of prayer? Swindoll, Charles R (2012-08-01). Living the Psalms: Encouragement for the Daily Grind (p. 44). Worthy Publishing. Kindle Edition. 
  6. True prayer must be aflame. Christian life and character need to be all on fire. Lack of spiritual heat creates more infidelity than lack of faith. Not to be consumingly interested about the things of heaven, is not to be interested in them at all. The fiery souls are those who conquer in the day of battle, from whom the kingdom of heaven suffereth violence, and who take it by force. The citadel of God is taken only by those, who storm it in dreadful earnestness, who besiege it, with fiery, unabated zeal. - From location 406 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  7. James 4:3 - You ask... that you may spend what you get on your pleasures.  When we make self the purpose of prayer, it is not worship of God but self- seeking. All our actions are to be referred and devoted to God; much more so with the acts that belong especially to the spiritual life, which is described in the words "live for God" (Galatians 2:19). That is the main difference between the worldly life and the spiritual; one is living for ourselves, the other is living for God. Especially, acts of worship are to be for God, for there the soul sets itself to glorify him.
    So then, consider your motives in prayer- not just the manner, not just what you are asking for, but the purpose. It is not enough to look for intensity of feeling; many people make that all their work, to raise themselves into some liveliness of spirit, but they do not consider their aim. It is true that it is good to come with full sails; fervent prayer is like an arrow drawn with all your strength, but it must be godly prayer. A worldly spring may send out high tides of feeling; our worldly desires are usually very earnest. It is not enough to look for fluency; worldly affections and imagination joined together may engage the wit and set it working. It is not enough to make God the object of the prayer- he must be its purpose too. Duty is sometimes called "serving God," serving denoting the object, and seeking denoting the end; in serving we must seek.  
    Our ends and aims are wrong when we ask blessings for the use and encouragement of our worldly desires. There are several ways in which people sin with reference to the aim of prayer:    
    (1) When the end is grossly worldly and sinful. Some people seek God for their sins and want to engage the divine blessing on a revengeful and worldly enterprise, just as the thief lit his torch in order to steal by the lamps of the altar. Solomon says that the wicked offer sacrifice "with evil intent" (Proverbs 21:27).  
    (2) When people seek to gratify their worldly desires privately, they look on God as some great power who must serve them. They are like the man who came to Christ saying, "Teacher, tell my brother to divide the inheritance with me" (Luke 12:13). We want something from God in order to satisfy our desires:health and long life, that we may live pleasantly; wealth, that we may live in luxury every day; estates, so we can improve our name and family; victory and success, to excuse ourselves from glorifying God by suffering, or to wreak our malice on enemies. The divine grace, by a vile submission and diversion, is forced to serve our vainglory.
    When we pray for blessings with a selfish aim, and not with serious and actual designs of God's glory, as when someone prays for spiritual blessings thinking only of his own ease and comfort, such as praying for pardon, heaven, grace, faith, repentance only in order to escape wrath. This is merely a worldly aspect of our own good and welfare. God wants us to think of our own comfort, but not only that. His glory is the pure spiritual aim. Then we seek these things with the same mind that God offers them:"to the praise of his glorious grace, which he has freely given us in the One he loves" (Ephesians 1:6). Your desires in asking are only right when they suit God's purposes in giving. God's glory is a better thing, and beyond our welfare and salvation. So it is too in temporal matters, when people desire outward provision merely in order to live more comfortably, not to serve God more cheerfully.
    Prayers framed out of worldly motives are usually unsuccessful. God's glory is the end of prayer and the beginning of hope, or else we can look for nothing. God never undertook to satisfy worldly desires. He will own no other voice in prayer but that of his own Spirit:"And he who searches our hearts knows the mind of the Spirit" (Romans 8:27). What is a worldly groan, and what is a spiritual groan? Expressing a worldly aim is merely a request met with a divine refutation; it is the best way to be denied. Spiritual sighs and breathings are heard rather than worldly roarings. If you cannot ask for mercy well, you will seldom be able to use it well; there is more enjoyment in the temptation. Usually our hearts are more devout when we want a blessing than when we enjoy it; and therefore when our prayers are not directed to God's glory, there is little hope that when we receive the talent we shall employ it for the Master's use.
    - From the commentary on James 4:3 from Crossway Classic Commentary - James by Thomas Manton.
  8. Ardent desire is the basis of unceasing prayer. It is not a shallow, fickle inclination, but a strong yearning, an unquenchable ardor, which impregnates, glows, burns, and fixes the heart. It is the flame of a present and active principle mounting up to God. It is ardor propelled by desire, that burns its way to the throne of mercy, and gains its plea. It is the pertinacity of desire that gives triumph to the conflict, in a great struggle of prayer. It is the burden of a weighty desire that sobers, makes restless, and reduces to quietness the soul just emerged from its mighty wrestlings. It is the embracing character of desire which arms prayer with a thousand pleas, and robes it with an invincible courage and an all-conquering power.  - From location 414 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  9. To pray is to meditate, to hear God and answer God. To hear well is to pray well. We would never speak to God unless God had first spoken to us. Your prayer life will never go further than your grasp of God’s Word. Right now—ask the Lord to speak his Word with “its full and proper impact” into your life. Patterson, Ben (2008-09-22). God's Prayer Book: The Power and Pleasure of Praying the Psalms (p. 26). Tyndale House Publishers - A. Kindle Edition. 
  10. Prayer is not the rehearsal of a mere performance; nor is it an indefinite, widespread clamor. Desire, while it kindles the soul, holds it to the object sought. Prayer is an indispensable phase of spiritual habit, but it ceases to be prayer when carried on by habit alone. It is depth and intensity of spiritual desire which give intensity and depth to prayer. The soul cannot be listless when some great desire fires and inflames it. The urgency of our desire holds us to the thing desired with a tenacity which refuses to be lessened or loosened; it stays and pleads and persists, and refuses to let go until the blessing has been given.  - From location 419 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  11. There can be no successful praying without consuming desire. Of course there can be much seeming to pray, without desire of any kind.  Desire is intense, but narrow; it cannot spread itself over a wide area. It wants a few things, and wants them badly, so badly, that nothing but God's willingness to answer, can bring it easement or content.  Desire single-shots at its objective. There may be many things desired, but they are specifically and individually felt and expressed. David did not yearn for everything; nor did he allow his desires to spread out everywhere and hit nothing. Here is the way his desires ran and found expression: One thing have I desired of the Lord, that will I seek after; that I may dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life, to behold the beauty of the Lord, and to enquire in his temple. It is this singleness of desire, this definiteness of yearning, which counts in praying, and which drives prayer directly to the core and center of supply. - From location 426 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  12. God draws mightily near to the praying soul. To see God, to know God, and to live for God-these form the objective of all true praying. Thus praying is, after all, inspired to seek after God. Prayer-desire is inflamed to see God, to have clearer, fuller, sweeter, and richer revelation of God. So to those who thus pray, the Bible becomes a new Bible, and Christ a new savior, by the light and revelation of the inner chamber.  - From location 440 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  13. The indispensable requisite for all true praying is a deeply seated desire which seeks after God himself, and remains unappeased, until the choicest gifts in heaven's bestowal, have been richly and abundantly granted. - From location 446 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  14. To pray in the name of Christ is to pray with the heart of Christ, ready and willing to do his will. Patrick Henry Reardon is absolutely right to say, “‘Your will be done,’ is the spiritual center of prayer ... [and] likewise the summation of the entire book of Psalms, and ultimately what makes Christian sense of the Psalter. Patterson, Ben (2008-09-22). God's Prayer Book: The Power and Pleasure of Praying the Psalms (p. 120). Tyndale House Publishers - A. Kindle Edition. 
  15. The incentive to fervency of spirit before God, is precisely the same as it is for continued and earnest prayer. While fervency is not prayer, yet it derives from an earnest soul, and is precious in the sight of God. Fervency in prayer is the precursor of what God will do by way of answer. God stands pledged to give us the desire of our hearts in proportion to the fervency of spirit we exhibit, when seeking his face in prayer.  - From location 468 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  16. It is not in our power, perhaps, to create fervency of spirit at will, but we can pray God to implant it. It is ours, then, to nourish and cherish it, to guard it against extinction, to prevent its abatement or decline. The process of personal salvation is not only to pray, to express our desires to God, but to acquire a fervent spirit and seek, by all proper means, to cultivate it. It is never out of place to pray God to beget within us, and to keep alive the spirit of fervent prayer.   - From location 472 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  17. Nothing distinguishes the children of God so clearly and strongly as prayer. It is the one infallible mark and test of being a Christian. Christian people are prayerful, the worldly-minded, prayerless. Christians call on God; worldlings ignore God, and call not on his name. But even the Christian had need to cultivate continual prayer. Prayer must he habitual, but much more than a habit. It is duty, yet one which rises far above, and goes beyond the ordinary implications of the term. It is the expression of a relation to God, a yearning for divine communion. It is the outward and upward flow of the inward life toward its original fountain. It is an assertion of the soul's paternity, a claiming of the sonship, which links man to the eternal. - From location 505 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  18. Remember that it’s always better to talk to God about how you feel about God than to others about how you feel about God. The most destructive aspect of any depression is the sense of abandonment by God. So talk to him about that! Prayer can turn the chasm into a bridge. Patterson, Ben (2008-09-22). God's Prayer Book: The Power and Pleasure of Praying the Psalms (p. 126). Tyndale House Publishers - A. Kindle Edition. 
  19. Importunity conquers all untoward circumstances and gets to itself a victory over a whole host of hindrances. He teaches, moreover, that an answer to prayer is conditional upon the amount of faith that goes to the petition. To test this, he delays the answer. The superficial pray-er subsides into silence, when the answer is delayed. But the man of prayer hangs on, and on. The Lord recognizes and honors his faith, and gives him a rich and abundant answer to his faith-evidencing, importunate prayer.  - From location 558 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  20. When the answer is not immediately given, the praying Christian must gather courage at each delay, and advance in urgency till the answer comes which is assured, if he have but the faith to press his petition with vigorous faith.   - From location 566 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  21. Laxity, faintheartedness, impatience, timidity will be fatal to our prayers. Awaiting the onset of our importunity and insistence, is the Father's heart, the Father's hand, the Father's infinite power, the Father's infinite willingness to hear and give to his children.  - From location 568 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  22. Psalm 55:17 - Morning, noon, and night I cry out in my distress, and the LORD hears my voice.  Bring greater structure and regularity to your prayer life. In the chaos and disjointedness of the circumstances and emotions swirling around him, David spoke of praying three times a day. This kind of “saying your prayers” at appointed times can counterbalance the drift into greater confusion that hard times and fear—“wild storm[s] of hatred” (verse 8)—usually bring. Patterson, Ben (2008-09-22). God's Prayer Book: The Power and Pleasure of Praying the Psalms (p. 147). Tyndale House Publishers - A. Kindle Edition. 
  23. Importunate praying never faints nor grows weary; it is never discouraged; it never yields to cowardice, but is buoyed up and sustained by a hope that knows no despair, and a faith which will not let go.  - From location 575 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  24. "Ask, and ye shall receive. Seek, and ye shall find. Knock, and it shall be opened unto you." These are the ringing challenges of our Lord in regard to prayer, and his intimation that true praying must stay, and advance in effort and urgency, till the prayer is answered, and the blessing sought, received.  - From location 580 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  25. In the three words ask, seek, knock, in the order in which he places them, Jesus urges the necessity of importunity in prayer. Asking, seeking, knocking, are ascending rounds in the ladder of successful prayer. No principle is more definitely enforced by Christ than that prevailing prayer must have in it the quality which waits and perseveres, the courage that never surrenders, the patience which never grows tired, the resolution that never wavers.  - From location 581 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  26. Faith has its province, in connection with prayer, and, of course, has its inseparable association with importunity. But the latter quality drives the prayer to the believing point. A persistent spirit brings a man to the place where faith takes hold, claims and appropriates the blessing.  - From location 596 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  27. " It is written, ‘Man does not live on bread alone, but on every word that comes from the mouth of God’” (Matthew 4:4; Deuteronomy 8:3, NIV). Here is a great way to pray: Turn your longings and hungers toward God. You may pray that they be removed. But pray also that they become reminders and parables of your need for God. Pain and suffering, frustration and anxiety can become sacramental experiences if you let them lead you to their deeper meaning in God. Patterson, Ben (2008-09-22). God's Prayer Book: The Power and Pleasure of Praying the Psalms (p. 159). Tyndale House Publishers - A. Kindle Edition. 
  28. We have need, too, to give thought to that mysterious fact of prayer-the certainty that there will be delays, denials, and seeming failures, in connection with its exercise. We are to prepare for these, to brook them, and cease not in our urgent praying. Like a brave soldier, who, as the conflict grows more stern, exhibits a superior courage than in the earlier stages of the battle; so does the praying Christian, when delay and denial face him, increase his earnest asking, and ceases not until prayer prevail. - From location 600 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  29. There can be no question but that importunate prayer moves God, and heightens human character! If we were more with God in this great ordinance of intercession, more brightly would our faces shine, more richly endowed would life and service be, with the qualities which earn the goodwill of humanity, and bring glory to the name of God. - From location 610 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  30. PRAYER governs conduct, and conduct makes character. Conduct is what we do; character is what we are. Conduct is the outward life. Character is the life unseen, hidden within, yet evidenced by that which is seen. Conduct is external, seen from without; character is internal-operating within. In the economy of grace conduct is the offspring of character. Character is the state of the heart, conduct its outward expression. Character is the root of the tree, conduct, the fruit it bears.  - From location 612 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  31. Prayer is related to all the gifts of grace. To character and conduct its relation is that of a helper. Prayer helps to establish character and fashion conduct, and both for their successful continuance depend on prayer. There may be a certain degree of moral character and conduct independent of prayer, but there cannot be anything like distinctive religious character and Christian conduct without it. Prayer helps, where all other aids fail. The more we pray, the better we are, the purer and better our lives.  - From location 615 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  32. Unrighteous conduct is born of prayerlessness; the two go hand-in-hand. Prayer and sinning cannot keep company with each other. One or the other must of necessity stop. Get men to pray, and they will quit sinning, because prayer creates a distaste for sinning, and so works upon the heart, that evildoing becomes repugnant, and the entire nature is lifted to a reverent contemplation of high and holy things.  - From location 635 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  33. Prayer is based on character. What we are with God gauges our influence with him. - From location 637 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  34. Whatsoever we ask, we receive of him, because we keep his commandments, and do those things which are pleasing in his sight.  - From location 654 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  35. Of course, the prayer of repentance is acceptable to God. He delights in hearing the cries of penitent sinners. But repentance involves not only sorrow for sin, but the turning away from wrong-doing, and the learning to do well. A repentance which does not produce a change in character and conduct, is a mere sham, which should deceive nobody. Old things must pass away, all things must become new.   - From location 668 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  36. Our praying advances in power, just insofar, as it rectifies the life. Growing in purity and devotion to God will be a more prayerful life.   - From location 673 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  37. To have an eye to God's glory; to he possessed by an earnest desire to please him in all our ways; to possess hands busy in his service; to have feet swift to run in the way of his commandments-these give weight and influence and power to prayer, and secure an audience with God. - From location 676 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  38. Through prayer and faith, man's nature is changed, and made partaker of the divine nature; that there is taken out of him all reluctance to obey God, and that his natural inability to keep God's commandments, growing out of his fallen and helpless state, is gloriously removed. By this radical change which is wrought in his moral nature, a man receives power to obey God in every way, and to yield full and glad allegiance. Then he can say, "1 delight to do thy will, 0 my God." Not only is the rebellion incident to the natural man removed, but a heart which gladly obeys God's Word, blessedly received. - From location 736 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  39. An obedient life is a great help to prayer. In fact, an obedient life is a necessity to prayer, to the sort which accomplishes things. The absence of an obedient life makes prayer an empty performance, a mere misnomer. - From location 780 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  40. True praying, he it remembered, is not mere sentiment, nor poetry, nor eloquent utterance. Nor does it consist of saying in honeyed cadences, "Lord, Lord." Prayer is not a mere form of words; it is not just calling upon a name. Prayer is obedience. It is founded on the adamantine rock of obedience to God. Only those who obey have the right to pray. Behind the praying must he the e doing; and it is the constant doing of God's will in daily life which gives prayer its potency, as our Lord plainly taught.  - From location 801 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  41. The will must be surrendered to God as a primary condition of all successful praying. Everything about us gets its coloring from our inmost character. The secret will makes character and controls conduct. The will, therefore, plays an important part in all successful praying. There can be no praying in its richest implication and truest sense, where the will is not wholly and fully surrendered to God. This unswerving loyalty to God is an utterly indispensable condition of the best, the truest, the most effectual praying. We have "simply got to trust and obey; there's no other way, to be happy in Jesus but to trust, and obey!" - From location 824 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  42. What a misconception many people have of the Christian life! How little the average church member appears to know of the character of the conflict, and of its demands upon him! How ignorant he seems to he of the enemies he must encounter, if he engage to serve God faithfully and so succeed in getting to heaven and receive the crown of life! He seems scarcely to realize that the world, the flesh and the devil will oppose his onward march, and will defeat him utterly; unless he give himself to constant vigilance and unceasing prayer.  - From location 841 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  43. The Christian soldier is to pray at all seasons, and under all circumstances. His praying must be arranged so as to cover his times of peace as well as his hours of active conflict. It must he available in his marching and his fighting. Prayer must diffuse all effort, impregnate all ventures, decide all issues. - From location 871 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  44. The soldier-prayer must reflect its profound concern for the success and well-being of the whole army. The battle is not altogether a personal matter; victory cannot be achieved for self, alone. There is a sense, in which the entire army of Christ is involved. The cause of God, his saints, their woes and trials, their duties and crosses, all should find a voice and a pleader in the Christian soldier, when he prays. He dare not limit his praying to himself. Nothing dries up spiritual secretions so certainly and completely; nothing poisons the fountain of spiritual life so effectively; nothing acts in such deadly fashion, as selfish praying.  - From location 876 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  45. Note carefully that the Christian's armor will avail him nothing, unless prayer be added. This is the pivot, the connecting link of the armor of God. This holds it together, and renders it effective. - From location 880 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  46. The entire life of a Christian soldier-its being, intention, implication, and action-are all dependent on its being a life of prayer. Without prayer-no matter what else he has-the Christian soldier's life will be feeble, and ineffective, and constitute him an easy prey for his spiritual enemies.  - From location 902 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  47. GOD'S Word is a record of prayer-of praying men and their achievements, of the divine warrant of prayer and of the encouragement given to those who pray. No one can read the instances, commands, examples, multiform statements which concern themselves with prayer, without realizing that the cause of God, and the success of his work in this world, is committed to prayer; that praying men have been God's deputies on earth; that prayerless men have never been used of him.  - From location 909 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  48. Faith is constructed of the Word and the Spirit, and faith is the body and substance of prayer.  - From location 918 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  49. The Word of God is the fulcrum upon which the lever of prayer is placed, and by which things are mightily moved. God has committed himself, his purpose, and his promise to prayer. His Word becomes the basis, the inspiration of our praying, and there are circumstances under which, by importunate prayer, we may obtain an addition, or an enlargement of his promises. - From location 919 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  50. Prayer may well be defined as that force which vitalizes and energizes the Word of God, by taking hold of God, himself. By taking hold of the promiser, prayer reissues, and makes personal the promise. "There is none that stirreth up himself to take hold of me," is God's sad lament. "Let him take hold of my strength, that he may make peace with me," is God's recipe for prayer.  - From location 924 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  51. The prayer of submission is without a definite word of promise, so to speak, but takes hold of God with a lowly and contrite spirit, and asks and pleads with him, for that which the soul desires. - From location 928 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  52. The Word of God is made effectual and operative by the process and practice of prayer. - From location 932 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  53. The Word of God is a great help in prayer. If it be lodged and written in our hearts, it will form an outflowing current of prayer, full and irresistible. Promises, stored in the heart, are to be the fuel from which prayer receives life and warmth, just as the coal, stored in the earth, ministers to our comfort on stormy days and wintry nights. - From location 937 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  54. The Word of God is the food, by which prayer is nourished and made strong. Prayer, like man, cannot live by bread alone, "but by every word which proceedeth out of the mouth of the Lord." - From location 939 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  55. Unless the vital forces of prayer are supplied by God's Word, prayer, though earnest even vociferous in its urgency, is in reality flabby, vapid, and void. The absence of vital force in praying can be traced to the absence of a constant supply of God's Word by which to repair the waste, and renew the life. He who would learn to pray well, must first study God's Word, and store it in his memory and thought.  - From location 941 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  56. Here are some of the comprehensive, and exhaustive statements of the Word of God about prayer, the things to be taken in by prayer, the strong promise made in answer to prayer: Pray without ceasing; continue in prayer; continuing instant in prayer; in everything by prayer, let your request be made known unto God; pray always, pray and not faint; men should pray everywhere; praying always, with all prayer and supplication.  - From location 947 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  57. If it is asked, what is to be done in order to render God's promises real, the answer is, that we must pray, until the words of the promise are clothed with the rich raiment of fulfillment.  - From location 956 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  58. Verily, verily, I say unto you, he that believeth on me, the works that I do shall he do also, and greater works than these shall he do, because I go to my Father. How comprehensive, how far reaching, how all-embracing! How much is here, for the glory of God, how much for the good of man! How much for the manifestation of Christ's enthroned power, how much for the reward of abundant faith! And how great and gracious are the results which can he made to accrue from the exercise of commensurate, believing prayer! - From location 959 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  59. Look, for a moment, at another of Gods great promises, and discover how we may he undergirded by the Word as we pray, and on what firm ground we may stand on which to make our petitions to our God: "If ye abide in me, and my words abide in you, ye shall ask what ye will, and it shall he done Unto YOU." In these comprehensive words, God turns himself over to the will of his people. When Christ becomes our all-in-all, prayer lays God's treasures at our feet. - From location 962 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  60. Prayer, coupled with loving obedience, is the way to put God to the test, and to make prayer answer all ends and all things. Prayer, joined to the Word of God, hallows and makes sacred all God's gifts. Prayer is not simply to get things from God, but to make those things holy, which already have been received from him. It is not merely to get a blessing, but also to he able to give a blessing. Prayer makes common things holy and secular things, sacred. It receives things from God with thanksgiving and hallows them with thankful hearts, and devoted service. - From location 967 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  61. Doing God's will, and having his Word abiding in us, is an imperative of effectual praying. But, it may be asked, how are we to know what God's will is? The answer is, by studying his Word, by hiding it in our hearts, and by letting the Word dwell in us richly. "The entrance of thy word, giveth light." - From location 973 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  62. Prayer invariably begets a love for the Word of God, and sets people to the reading of it. Prayer leads people to obey the Word of God, and puts into the heart which obeys a joy unspeakable. Praying people and Bible-reading people are the same sort of folk. The God of the Bible and the God of prayer are one. God speaks to man in the Bible; man speaks to God in prayer. One reads the Bible to discover God's will; he prays in order that he may receive power to do that will. Bible-reading and praying are the distinguishing traits of those who strive to know and please God. And just as prayer begets a love for the Scriptures, and sets people to reading the Bible, so, also, does prayer cause men and women to visit the house of God, to hear the Scriptures expounded. - From location 1008 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  63. He who would have a heart for the reading of the Bible must not-dare not-forget to pray. The man of whom it can be said, "His delight is in the law of the Lord," is the man who can truly say, "I delight to visit the place of prayer." No man loves the Bible, who does not love to pray. No man loves to pray, who does not delight in the law of the Lord.  - From location 1030 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  64. Here, let it be said, that no two things are more essential to a spirit-filled life than Bible-reading and secret prayer; no two things more helpful to growth in grace; to getting the largest joy out of a Christian life; toward establishing one in the ways of eternal peace. The neglect of these all-important duties, presages leanness of soul, loss of joy, absence of peace, dryness of spirit, decay in all that pertains to spiritual life. Neglecting these things paves the way for apostasy, and gives the evil one an advantage such as he is not likely to ignore. Reading God's Word regularly, and praying habitually in the secret place of the most high puts one where he is absolutely safe from the attacks of the enemy of souls, and guarantees him salvation and final victory, through the overcoming power of the lamb.  - From location 1035 in the Kindle book "Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer, The: Experience the Wonders of God through Prayer" by E. M. Bounds.
  65. Those that pray much will have much to give thanks for.  - From Matthew Henry's Commentary on the Whole Bible in commentary on Psalm 119:62.
  66. The Bible underscores two things that God honors above all else:his name and his Word. “I will exalt you, my God the King; I will praise your name for ever and ever… for you have exalted above all things your name and your word” (Ps. 145:1; Ps. 138:2). When we bring God’s Word directly into our praying, we are bringing God’s power into our praying. 
  67. “The word of God is living and active. Sharper than any double- edged sword…” ( Heb. 4: 12). God’s Word gives our prayers life, infusing vitality into our praises and petitions, as well as the thoughts that frame our petitions. 
  68. “’Is not my word like fire,’ declares the Lord, ‘and like a hammer that breaks a rock in pieces? ’” ( Jer. 23: 29). To use God’s Word in prayer is to employ divine power in breaking strongholds and demolishing arguments of the enemy. 
  69. “And we also thank God continually because, when you received the word of God, which you heard from us, you accepted it not as the word of men, but as it actually is, the word of God, which is at work in you who believe” ( 1 Thess. 2: 13). If God’s Word works in our lives, think how much more it works in our prayers. - From the book" Speaking God's Language" by Joni Eareckson Tada by Rose Publishing.
  70. Praying Scripture Changes Things—and You - 
  71. The more you center in prayer on God’s Word, the more its power and life becomes not only a part of those for whom you pray; it also becomes part of you. 
  72. Focus on quoting God’s mercies in prayer as David did, and you will become more merciful. Concentrate on the Cross when you pray, and you’ll become more forgiving. 
  73. Hearken to the confessions of Jeremiah and Isaiah in prayer and your conscience will become more sensitive to evil. 
  74. Quote Paul’s example in your prayers, and you won’t try to rationalize or explain away your sin. Plead with God about his wisdom, quoting Proverbs 4, and you will become wiser. Continue to plead, and you’ll also gain knowledge, understanding, discernment, and prudence.
  75. Lace your worship with psalms of praise and you will experience the joy of worship. 
  76. Center your requests around his holiness and you will grow in holiness. - From the book" Speaking God's Language" by Joni Eareckson Tada by Rose Publishing.
  77. Matthew 6:7-13 - The Lord teaching us how to pray (modern Lord's Prayer), taken from The Message Bible:
  78. 7-13 "The world is full of so-called prayer warriors who are prayer-ignorant. They're full of formulas and programs and advice, peddling techniques for getting what you want from God. Don't fall for that nonsense. This is your Father you are dealing with, and he knows better than you what you need. With a God like this loving you, you can pray very simply. Like this:
    1. Our Father in heaven,
    2. Reveal who you are.
    3. Set the world right;
    4. Do what's best— as above, so below.
    5. Keep us alive with three square meals.
    6. Keep us forgiven with you and forgiving others.
    7. Keep us safe from ourselves and the Devil.
    8. You're in charge!
    9. You can do anything you want!
    10. You're ablaze in beauty!
    11. Yes. Yes. Yes.
  79. Let’s consider what it means to pray in the name of Jesus.
    1. Shortly before he was led to the cross, our Savior said, “I will do whatever you ask in my name… you may ask me for anything in my name, and I will do it” (John 14:13–14). These are profound words from the lips of Jesus. What does that mean for us? Surely, it means more than saying “In Jesus’ name” at the end of a prayer.
    2. To pray in the name of Jesus is to pray admitting that God hears me only because I’m the guest of his Son. It’s to pray in the bold but respectful way that Jesus did while on earth. 
    3. To pray in Jesus’ name means we ask God for the things Jesus taught us to ask. He summarizes them in the Lord’s Prayer:spiritual things, eternal things. “May your kingdom spread... May your plans be accomplished on this rebellious planet... Forgive the way I’ve treated you... Keep me from falling for the evil that allures me” (See Matt. 6:9–13). Only one request in six deals with earthbound matters, and even there hetaught us to pray, “Give us this day our daily bread” —not, “Bless the Dow Jones Average and please be with the NASDAQ in the next financial quarter.” 
    4. To pray in the name of Christ is to pray in a way that reflects his character and his priorities. It is to pray with his agenda in mind. The whole purpose behind Christ’s coming was to spread the message that sin kills, hell is real, God is merciful, his kingdom can save us, and Christ is our passport. May all our prayers reflect these core values that Jesus held dearly when he offered his prayers to the Father. - From the book" Speaking God's Language" by Joni Eareckson Tada by Rose Publishing.
  80. Psalm 119:149 - When God hears prayer according to his lovingkindness he overlooks all the imperfections of the prayer, he forgets the sinfulness of the offerer, and in pitying love he grants the desire though the suppliant be unworthy. It is according to God's lovingkindness to answer speedily, to answer frequently, to answer abundantly, yea, exceeding abundantly above all that we ask or even think. Lovingkindness is one of the sweetest words in our language. Kindness has much in it that is most precious, but loving kindness is doubly dear; it is the cream of kindness. - From Psalm 119:149 of The Parallel Commentary on the Psalms by Mark Water
  81. Pay attention to our posture. No slumping in our chairs or sitting with our legs crossed as we approach our awesome God. It is far more appropriate to lean forward on the edge of our seats, or to kneel, or to stand with arms raised, or to lie face down on the floor. One contemporary writer on prayer has described this last position as "eating rug." How fitting, especially when we 're confessing sin or expressing our total dependence upon God, to be prostrate before him. If you' ve never eaten rug, I 'd highly recommend it.- Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  82. I have also found it helpful to pace as I pray. I am more attentive and energized as I walk the river where we live or cover the hallways (or campus) of our church or stroll from one room of our house to another. When I am physically alert my spirit follows suit. - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  83. A second prayer intensifier is to add passion to our tone of voice. This may feel contrived at first, but if it is done out of a sincere desire to pray passionately it works. I am reminded of a poster of the legendary tennis pro Arthur Ashe on my dorm room wall years ago. He was stretched out, tennis racket extended, body parallel to the ground, reaching for a ball. The caption read:"If you 'll act enthusiastic, you' ll be enthusiastic." - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  84. I have found this to be true in many areas of life. When I make myself act appropriately, even though I don 't feel like doing so initially, a transformation takes place in me. In a short time the desired behavior becomes natural. If I want to pray more passionately, I must begin to give my words an edge as I speak with God. Make them sound as if they' re an appeal, not an aside.
  85. When was the last time you prayed passionately about something? When was the last time you prayed passionately for the salvation of a spiritually lost friend or loved one? When was the last time you cried out to God for the wisdom you desperately needed to make a critical decision? When was the last time you pleaded with him to deliver you from a sin which has plagued you for far too long? When was the last time you interceded with a broken heart for those who are victimized by the tragedies of famine, AIDS, terrorism, or natural disaster.   - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  86. Sometimes we forget that God is for us. This is especially true when we don 't get immediate answers to our prayers. Doesn' t God care? More than we know! And that's why we should always pray and not give up.  - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  87. God wants us to always pray and not give up. If we throw in the towel too soon, we 'll miss the opportunity to see what God would' ve done had we persisted.  - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  88. We are more likely to stick with (and enjoy) an activity once we find others to do it with. It doesn 't matter if that activity is a personal habit (such as exercising or dieting) or recreation (such as going to the symphony or golfing) or a spiritual discipline (such as studying the Bible or praying). If it's something that we' d like to make a practice of doing, we should find others who will do it with us. If you are married, I can 't encourage you strongly enough to make prayer a regular habit with your spouse. - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  89. I have found it quite natural to suggest at the conclusion of such a conversation, "Would you mind if I pray for you right now about this issue?" In all the times that I 've asked for this permission, I' ve only been turned down once. (And I 'll describe why that happened in a later chapter- there was a happy ending to the incident.) Christians and unbelievers alike seem genuinely appreciative that I care enough to pray for them. While they are not, strictly speaking, partnering with me in prayer on these occasions (i. e., I' m doing all the talking with God), my intercession is energized when it takes place in the company of others.
  90. A by- product of introducing prayer into my conversations is that it forces me to be a better listener. In order to pray intelligently and empathetically with other people I must pay close attention to what they are saying. Try it!   - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  91. I can think of no better way to begin a day than by praying on the believer's armor. Every day we 're engaged in a spiritual war- whether we' re aware of it or not. Our enemy stalks us relentlessly, like a roaring lion, hoping to devour us (1 Pet. 5:8). If we are not prepared for such a foe we will end up becoming his lunch. That's why I 've taught my kids- and the men whom I disciple in an early morning small group- how to pray on the armor.   - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  92. There are six pieces of armor described in Ephesians 6. Each article consists of two parts:belt /truth; breastplate /righteousness; shoes /gospel; shield /faith; helmet /salvation; sword /Word of God. Both parts must be considered in order to understand how to pray on each piece of armor.   - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  93. Let's begin with the belt of truth. When a Roman soldier went into battle he would tuck his loose- hanging outer garment into his belt so as not to trip on it as he advanced against the enemy. God has given us a belt to wear. Our belt is truth. If we want to avoid getting tripped up and falling on our faces, spiritually speaking, we must pray that God helps us to be honest, free- from- deceit people of integrity throughout the course of our day
  94. The breastplate, the next piece of armor, was intended to cover a soldier's most vital organs. Without his breastplate in place he was dead meat. If we want to protect our spiritual lives we must cover our hearts with the righteousness of Christ. This righteousness, in terms of its practical outworking, is a reflection of Christ's character. So we pray on the breastplate of righteousness by asking God to make us more like his Son- more loving, holy, patient, faithful, merciful, and so on
  95. A soldier's shoes, in Paul's day, had cleats on the bottom. This allowed him to move forward without slipping and sliding. (As the dad of a soccer- playing son, I 've had many opportunities to watch players whose shoes failed to grab wet turf. It's an amusing sight- until somebody gets hurt in a collision or from a pulled groin muscle.) Our shoes help us to advance Christ's kingdom. That's why Paul refers to them as "gospel" shoes. We need to pray that God will give us both the courage and the right words to share the good news of Christ with others- to move forward into these situations instead of retreating from them
  96. Don 't think of a Roman soldier's shield as being the size and shape of a garbage can lid. The shield that Paul had in mind was almost as tall as the man, protecting him head to toe when he was crouched behind it. It was made of numerous layers of leather that had been soaked in water. All incendiary missiles would be extinguished upon contact. The believer's shield is faith. Not just saving faith, but a daily confidence in God. We must pray for God to give us an optimistic spirit when the arrows of discouragement, criticism, hardship, stress, and dilemma are shot at us
  97. A helmet, of course, covered a soldier's head. A believer's head- mind, thoughts, attitudes- is to be protected by salvation. What is included in this concept of salvation? Well, what has happened to us as a result of being saved? The Holy Spirit has taken up residence in our lives. Our sins have been forgiven. We have become citizens of an eternal kingdom. There is an unimaginable inheritance awaiting us in heaven. We pray on the helmet of salvation by asking God to fill our minds with these realities. We invite God, for example, to give us a greater preoccupation with the thought of his being our Father (by virtue of salvation) than with our usual thoughts:worrying about buying a new lawnmower, or noticing the good- looking girl who just walked by, or lamenting the raise we didn 't get, or growling at the terrible traffic
  98. Finally, no soldier is fully equipped without a sword in hand. This is the only offensive piece of armor. It enables one to take it to the enemy. Our sword is God's Word. Jesus showed us how to use it when he turned the tables on Satan's temptations in the wilderness. Jesus responded to each attack with a Scripture quotation. (Notice that all the verses Jesus used came from the Old Testament book of Deuteronomy. How many of us could defend ourselves against our spiritual enemy- and go on the offensive- by quoting from Deuteronomy?) We pray on the sword by asking God to give us the time and discipline and insight to study his Word. And the ability to put it into practice
  99. We can 't ask God, however, to give us the fruits of his Spirit unless we know what they are. They are love; joy; peace; patience; kindness; goodness; faithfulness; gentleness; and self- control (Gal. 5:22- 23). Nine fruits in all.   - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  100. I don 't usually pray through this entire list. I just choose the fruit that seems most needful in my life at the moment and ask God to produce it in me. Sometimes I pray this prayer when I' m by myself. Sometimes I use it to stimulate prayer when I 'm with one of my kids or wrapping up a small group meeting. "Let's pray the fruit of the Spirit," I' ll suggest. "I 'll take one and pray it through and then you take one and do the same."   - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  101. Body Parts  - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  102. Although I often use this pattern of prayer in private, I have much more fun with it when I introduce it to a group of people- because I insist that it be accompanied by body motions (always a challenge with guys). "'Body parts' prayer!" I 'll announce, for example, on a Sunday morning to our congregation.
  103. This will be followed by the declaration:"Lord, we give you our eyes." As soon as this is said, we all put our hands on our eyes while I continue. "Our eyes have been used for sinful purposes this week- to look at people and things in a way that made us covet, or lust, or boast. But now we offer you these eyes and ask you to help us see others as you see them."
  104. "And, Lord, we give you our feet." Now, we begin to stamp or shuffle our feet. "These feet have taken us to some places where we shouldn' t have gone. But now we ask you to use them to carry us into situations where we can serve others or share Christ."
  105. "And, Lord, we give you our tongues. Stick them out and grab them if you 'd like!" (I' m not kidding.) A quick confession ensues of all the ways in which we 've used our mouths sinfully, followed by an entreaty that we might use our words in a way that pleases God and blesses others.
  106. "And, Lord, we give you our hands." We lift them high over our heads and shake them. (All charisphobics are now freaking out.) "Our hands have been used," we acknowledge, "to hoard stuff and to strike our kids in anger and to gesture (profanely) at drivers who cut us off in traffic. But we want our hands to be employed," we tell God, "in serving others and in communicating squeezes of encouragement."
  107. "And, Lord, we give you our hearts." We place our hands over hearts like we' re reciting the Pledge of Allegiance. Our hearts represent our desires and affections. What have we been wrongfully setting them on? What would God want us to have hearts for?
  108. This is a prayer pattern that you can teach your kids. And it comes in handy when you 've got just a few minutes with them in the car on the way to school, or to a soccer game, or to a friend's house. You start with a body part of your choice. (I always began with the mouth since that seemed to be the member that was most likely to get my kids into trouble.)
  109. "Lord, we give you our mouths." (Use plural pronouns as you pray since you' re interceding for both yourself and anyone else who's participating.) "These mouths have been used to say some pretty bad stuff- lies, put- downs, profanity, gossip, complaints. We feel like Isaiah, who asked you to touch his lips with a burning coal to purify him. We want you to use our mouths to communicate words of praise, encouragement, salvation, wise counsel."
  110. Do you see how this "body parts" pattern of prayer works? After each part is mentioned and identified by some motion, we pray for it along two lines. First, we repent of the ways in which we have used that member of our bodies to sin. Second, we offer God that very same member to use in his service
  111. Prayer List Method - Let me offer you a simpler approach. A guilt- free approach. An approach that recognizes the fact that some days you 're going to miss your prayer time. I keep an A to Z list of friends on one page, front and back, in my "quiet time" journal (a spiral bound notebook in which I record my daily insights from Scripture). I stick a little Post- it note under the person's name I last prayed for on a previous day. Some days I have the time to pray for five or six people, so I move the note down accordingly. Other days I' m in a hurry and may get to only one or two names.
  112. And occasionally I miss interceding for others altogether. But I don 't beat myself up over this lapse. I don' t do penance by making myself pray for twice as many people the next day. I just pick up where I left off and continue on down my list, moving my Post- it note as I go. It may take me a few weeks to cover everyone I 've determined to pray for, but there's a steady thoroughness to this approach that gives me a sense of deep satisfaction.   - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  113. A side benefit I 've discovered, in becoming a more consistent intercessor for others, is that I' m learning to listen more attentively during conversations. I want to detect and remember any prayer- worthy concerns that are expressed. This will give me something specific to talk to God about the next time I 'm praying for those I' ve spoken with.  I also experience great joy when friends mention in passing something that God has recently done in their lives- and it's the very thing I 've been praying for them! There's almost a secret exchange that takes place between God and me when this happens. "Little do they know," I tell God, "that my prayers made a huge contribution to this outcome." (And God usually responds, "Let's just keep that between the two of us."   - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  114. "It's 'thank- you' prayertime." Then start thanking God for whatever he brings to mind- one item at a time.
  115. I 've found it helpful to do this by category (otherwise I forget entire classes of things to thank God for). I' ll start out with the most obvious type of blessings:physical. This would include my health, my job, my home, my cars (both of which have over 150, 000 miles on them and are still going strong), vacation getaways (right now, as I 'm writing, I' m looking at Lake Michigan from the beach house of a friend who's made it available to me), music (from Bach to Bono), and so on.   - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  116. Spiritual blessings are my next category. I thank God for (in no particular order):the forgiveness of sins, the indwelling Holy Spirit, the counsel of his Word, an eternal home in heaven, the life- mission of advancing Christ's kingdom, and the peace of God's presence.
  117. The people in my life- relational blessings- follow. I thank God for my wife of thirty years. I could spend my entire "thank- you" prayer time on Sue (which would be healthy for my marriage- especially if she's within earshot). I thank God for my three kids (to balance out all the times I 've spent wringing my hands over how they' ll turn out). I thank God for my co- workers, the guys in my small group, my accountability partner (being especially grateful for the way he keeps confidences). If you 're in sales, thank God for your customers.   - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  118. Philippians 4:6- 7: "Do not be anxious about anything, but in everything, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.  - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  119. "If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness" (1 John 1:9). I encourage new Christ followers to memorize this verse as soon as they can. Like Psalm 51, it comes in handy whenever there is sin in our lives that needs to be confessed (i. e., every day).  - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  120. This Scripture plainly teaches that if something is big enough to worry about, it's big enough to pray about.  "You can do all sorts of things after you 've prayed. But you can do nothing of significance until you' ve prayed."  Immediately. Don 't wait. Anxiety is a prompting from the Holy Spirit to pray.   - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  121. I've discovered that I sometimes worry without even realizing that I' m worrying. I 'm like the duck that appears to be floating along serenely while below the waterline it's paddling desperately. Impatience or irritability are usually the tip- off that some invisible anxiety is gnawing away at me. I actually have to go to God on these occasions and ask, "Lord, would you help me define what I' m worried about?" Only then am I able to pray about my anxiety.  Our worries are a sign of our helplessness. Something is out of our control. Something is wrong and we can 't fix it. Something is confusing and we can' t figure it out. Something needs to happen and we are powerless to make it happen. Helplessness. Do you feel it? Then pray. I read a definition for prayer some time ago that I really liked:Prayer is helplessness plus faith. Yes.   - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  122. Thanksgiving reminds us that God is in control and that he has a long track record of resolving crises like ours. This is why it is so important to think of anything and everything we can thank God for when we 're bringing him our concerns.   - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  123. "Be joyful always; pray continually" (1 Thess. 5:16- 17). Is Paul telling us that joy and prayer are to go hand in hand? That seems to be his point.  Occasions of joy are the Holy Spirit's promptings to pray. God desires that we share our good news with him. When you close a big deal that you 've been working on for months, take a few minutes for a "Yeah, God!" before you pick up the phone to call your boss. When your son climbs into the car after winning his soccer game, turn to him and say, "Let's tell God how much we enjoyed that victory and everything that went into it." When you see a spectacular sunset, don' t just feel awed. Share the experience with the One who painted that sky.   - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  124. "Let him sing songs of praise." "Songs of praise" are just prayers of joy that have been set to music. Happiness should not go unexpressed. It must be given voice. And the One to whom we address these outbursts, first and foremost, should be God.   - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  125. Temptation should prompt us to pray! Why? Because Jesus understands our predicament, because he has successfully fought- and won- similar battles, and because he has explicitly invited us to approach him in prayer when cornered by temptation.   - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  126. James would tell us to remind ourselves, when tempted, that the very desires which are pulling us toward sin can be met in a much better way- by presenting them to the Giver of all good gifts, by asking the Giver to satisfy us. Have you ever prayed along these lines in the midst of temptation? Try it. Open your mouth and say, "Lord, I 'm feeling the tug of sin. Would you please satisfy the desire that sin is promising to fulfill?" It may help you to identify what that desire is. But even if you can' t put your finger on it, cry out to the Giver with the simple entreaty, "Lord, satisfy me." God can satisfy us in a way that sin cannot- despite its promises to the contrary. This is why we must pray when tempted. Not just for Jesus- like strength to resist the pressure, but also for a wholesome satisfying of the desire that will eliminate that pressure.  - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  127. We must cultivate the habit of immediately interceding for those who have just unburdened themselves on us.
  128. Their concerns should be recognized as a prompting to pray. Not eventually. Right now. Because we all know the guilt of forgetting to pray for those to whom we made that simple promise, "I 'll be praying for you." The guilt only intensifies when these folks see us a few days later and say, "Thanks so much for praying for me- God has really turned things around." When we don 't intercede as soon as we encounter these needs there's a good chance that we' ll never get around to doing so.  - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  129. Our key verse for such a practice is Ephesians 6:18:"And pray in the Spirit on all occasions with all kinds of prayers and requests. With this in mind, be alert and always keep on praying for all the saints." You can 't miss the three "all's" and one "always" in this verse. Paul is encouraging us to pray for others at the drop of a hat. Or, as we' re prompted, at the drop of a concern.   - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  130. "Love your enemies" is sure to make the short list. Everybody knows that this is something that Christ followers are supposed to do. And most of us feel like we do do it. That's because we've reduced Jesus' words to mean:tolerate your enemies, or ignore your enemies, or don 't do anything bad to your enemies. We respond to Jesus' command with passivity  But when we look at this command in its context, we see that Jesus will not settle for a passive response. He expects us to take action. What action? Let's read it for ourselves:"Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who mistreat you" (Luke 6:27- 28). Loving our enemies includes doing good to them, blessing them, and praying for them.  - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  131. The book "The Power of Crying Out" 1 Less than a hundred pages long, this book is packed with insights.  The book's thesis is pretty well summed up in its title. There is more power to our prayers when they are delivered with some oomph. (Don 't ask me to define oomph. Just the sound one makes when saying it should communicate its meaning.) We can pray. Or, we can PRAY. What's the difference? PRAYING (as compared to praying) is marked by greater volume, determination, and passion.
  132. Gothard claims to see a pattern in Scripture. There are times, he notes, when God allows difficult circumstances in the lives of his people. We pray for help. But nothing happens. God refuses to get involved until we "cry out"- and not a second sooner. This crying out demonstrates an earnestness in our praying. It's a bit like kneeling down or fasting, two other physical acts that underscore the fact that we mean business.  - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  133. Our crying out stirs the heart of God. Psalm 18 paints a vivid picture of God's response to a passionately prayed prayer. "In my distress," the psalmist recounts, "I called to the Lord; I cried to my God for help. From his temple he heard my voice; my cry came before him, into his ears" (Ps. 18:6). King David didn 't just pray. He called and cried to the Lord. - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  134. What happened next, as described in Psalm 18, was so thrilling that I once read this passage to my congregation on a Sunday morning with the "William Tell Overture" (also known as "The Lone Ranger Theme Song") playing in the background. It was so cool! Our sound technician just cranked up the music (go ahead and hum along) as I read these words:
    1. The earth trembled and quaked,
    2. and the foundations of the mountains shook;
    3. they trembled because he was angry.
    4. Smoke rose from his nostrils;
    5. consuming fire came from his mouth,
    6. burning coals blazed out of it.
    7. He parted the heavens and came down;
    8. dark clouds were under his feet.
    9. He mounted the cherubim and flew;
    10. he soared on the wings of the wind.
    11. He made darkness his covering, his canopy around him-
    12. the dark rain clouds of the sky.
    13. Out of the brightness of his presence clouds advanced,
    14. with hailstones and bolts of lightning.
    15. The Lord thundered from heaven;
    16. the voice of the Most High resounded.
    17. He shot his arrows and scattered the enemies,
    18. great bolts of lightning and routed them.
    19. The valleys of the sea were exposed
    20. and the foundations of the earth laid bare at your rebuke, O Lord,
    21. at the blast of breath from your nostrils.
    22. He reached down from on high and took hold of me;
    23. he drew me out of deep waters.
    24. He rescued me from my powerful enemy,
    25. from my foes, who were too strong for me. (Ps. 18:7- 17)
    26. Now that's an answer to prayer! Would you like to see God intervene in your life with that kind of flair? Ain' t gonna happen as long as you 're praying ho- hum prayers. Don' t forget what launched God on this spectacular search and rescue mission. David had filled his lungs with air and then let loose with a loud cry to the Lord. That's exactly what Heaven had been waiting to hear. "I 'm on my way!" God responded.   - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  135. A passionate prayer is definite. A passionate prayer is desperate. A passionate prayer is dependent. And these are characteristics that invite God to fly to our rescue.  - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  136. Perhaps our prayers lack definition because our hearts lack faith. If we stop short of being really specific about what we want from God then we won 't be let down when he doesn' t deliver. I have a feeling that a lot of "your- will- be- done" praying falls into this category.  When we cry out to God with clarity, we're putting it all on the line. We' re taking a step of faith. We 're declaring our confidence in God's ability to do exactly what we' re asking of him. This is what he's waiting to hear from us.   - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  137. James, in his New Testament epistle, goes so far as to say that if we allow doubt to creep into our prayers we might as well not pray. Just save our breath. He offers this counsel to those who are asking God for wisdom:
  138. If any of you lacks wisdom, he should ask God, who gives generously to all without finding fault, and it will be given to him. But when he asks, he must believe and not doubt, because he who doubts is like a wave of the sea, blown and tossed by the wind. That man should not think he will receive anything from the Lord... (James 1:5- 7).
  139. Do you want to drive doubt out of your prayers? Cry out to the Lord! Tell God, passionately, that you need him to heal your body, or give you victory over some sin, or restore your marriage, or provide a job, or help you understand algebra, or embolden you to share Christ with your friends. Passionate prayers are definite prayers. And definite prayers get answered.  - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  140. Humility. We lift God up as we lower ourselves down. Our words and our posture communicate his greatness.  - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  141. When we fail to enter God's gates with thanksgiving and his courts with praise, we are just being plain rude. And this is a discourtesy of great magnitude because we are dealing with royalty. - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  142. In Psalm 100 God is also addressed as God (not surprisingly, but worth some pondering), as Creator and Owner (both implied in the line:"It is he who made us, and we are his"), as Shepherd (since we're "the sheep of his pasture"), and as King (since he has "courts" that we are to "enter with praise").  If you want to get good at honoring God in prayer you must make a habit of observing the attributes and titles and names by which he goes in Scripture. - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  143. Jesus is not going to answer our prayers until we start to value our relationship more than our requests, until we want more "of" him than we want "from" him. God wants us to put a greater priority on our relationship with him than on our requests. If we truly want more "of" God than "from" God, then we should be willing to accept whatever answers to our prayers draw us closer to him - even if those answers are not the ones we'd hoped for.  - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  144. God likes it when we show up in prayer, friends. And he likes it when we accept from his hand whatever draws us closer to him.  - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  145. Jesus doesn 't limit us to just one wish. He welcomes us to "ask whatever you wish." This, of course, assumes that we have met the prayer condition. That we are remaining in him and his word is remaining in us. That we are wanting, more than anything else, for the answer to our prayer to result in a more intimate relationship with God.  If we are truly prioritizing this relationship, then we are ready to present our requests. And God is eager to respond to them.  - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  146. Don 't assume that just because Jesus already knows what you need that there's no reason to state the particulars in prayer. "You do not have," James shakes his head at us, "because you do not ask God" (James 4:2).  - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  147. Be specific.  When you start getting specific, as you present your requests to God, you 'll discover that your one-minute prayers grow into five - minute and ten-minute prayers. Occasionally, you may go outside for a prayer-walk and find yourself talking to God for a half-hour or more - something you couldn' t imagine yourself doing in the past. And those extended conversations (here's the bonus) will contribute toward your highest prayer goal of developing your relationship with God.  Prioritize the relationship. Present the requests.  - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  148. The more you want Him, the less those "other things" are going to matter to you. You 'll find yourself praying about things that matter to Jesus.  - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  149. Sometimes God won 't give us the results we ask for: a healing from cancer, or a restored marriage, or a more understanding boss, or the complete removal of a certain temptation, or acceptance into the college of our choice, or a good friend to hang out with, or whatever. And the reason God won't give us the results we ask for, on many occasions, is because that wouldn 't be the best way for us to be drawn closer to him. And that's the primary result that both God and we desire. Right? Every other result is of secondary importance.
  150. So, does this lead us to stop praying about everything other than a more intimate relationship with Christ? (After all, everything else is of secondary importance.) No! Just the opposite. Because we understand that Jesus loves us so much that he's going to use everything we pray about as a means of drawing us closer to him, we pray with enthusiasm and confidence.
  151. We are always going to get the primary result that we're after. We presume it. And often the Lord is going to throw in the secondary result as well, as a bonus. But whether he does or he doesn't, we still win.  - Prayer Coach - For All Who Want to Get Off the Bench and onto the Praying Field by James L. Nicodem
  152. Proverb 17:21 - He who sires a fool gets himself sorrow, and the father of a fool has no joy.  Let the godly parent expect everything from prayer. In the deepest distress never let go of the covenant of grace. Let the determined faith of a praying mother encourage you to persevere (Matthew 15:22- 28). God requires faith, but he never fails to honor it. He may delay in answering prayer, but every word, every sigh, is registered for acceptance in his best time - From the Kindle Book "Classic Crossway Book Commentary - Proverbs" from Charles Bridges.
  153. Praying unlocks the doors of Heaven and releases the power of God. James 4:2 says, “You do not have because you do not ask.” The Bible says, “Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God” (Philippians 4:6). And we are to let God know not only our needs but also the needs of others. So often our prayers focus only on ourselves. But God wants to use us, through our prayers, to touch the lives of other people as well. For whom should you be praying this day? - Graham, Billy (2012-06-12). Hope for Each Day Morning and Evening Devotions (p. 442). Thomas Nelson. Kindle Edition. 
  154. God often permits that we should suffer a little to purify our souls and oblige us to continue with Him. Take courage; offer Him your pains incessantly; pray to Him for strength to endure them. Above all, get a habit of entertaining yourself often with God, and forget Him the least you can. Adore Him in your infirmities, offer yourself to Him from time to time, and in the height of your sufferings beseech Him humbly and affectionately (as a child his father) to make you conformable to His holy will. - Brother Lawrence (1967-02-01). Practice of the Presence of God, The (Kindle Locations 449-453). Baker Publishing Group. Kindle Edition. 
  155. We must act purely in faith. But though it is difficult, we know also that we can do all things with the grace of God, which He never refuses to them who ask it earnestly. Knock, persevere in knocking, that He will open to you in His due time, and grant you all at once what He has deferred during many years.  - Brother Lawrence (1967-02-01). Practice of the Presence of God, The (Kindle Locations 481-484). Baker Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.